flexion


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Related to flexion: Plantar flexion

flexion

 [flek´shun]
1. the act of bending or the condition of being bent.
2. in obstetrics, the normal bending forward of the head of the fetus in the uterus or birth canal so that the chin rests on the chest, thereby presenting the smallest diameter of the vertex.
plantar flexion bending of the toes or foot downwards toward the sole.

flex·ion

(flek'shŭn), [TA] Avoid the misspelling flection.
1. The act of flexing or bending, for example, bending of a joint to approximate the parts it connects; bending of the spine so that the concavity of the curve looks forward.
2. The condition of being flexed or bent.
[L. flecto, pp. flexus, to bend]

flexion

/flex·ion/ (flek´shun) the act of bending or the condition of being bent.

flexion

(flĕk′shən)
n.
1. also flection Anatomy
a. The act of bending a joint or limb in the body by the action of flexors.
b. The resulting condition of being bent.
2. A part that is bent.

flexion

[flek′shən]
Etymology: L, flectere, to bend
1 a movement allowed by certain joints of the skeleton that decreases the angle between two adjoining bones, such as bending the elbow, which decreases the angle between the humerus and the ulna. Compare extension.
2 a resistance to the descent of the fetus through the birth canal that causes the neck to flex so the chin approaches the chest. Thus the smallest diameter (suboccipitobregmatic) of the vertex presents.
enlarge picture
Flexion and extension of the elbow

flex·ion

(flek'shŭn)
1. The act of flexing or bending, e.g., bending of a joint so as to approximate the parts it connects; bending of the spine.
2. The condition of being flexed or bent.
See: open-packed position (2)
[L. flecto, pp. flexus, to bend]

flexion

1. The act of bending of a joint or other part or the state of being bent.
2. Pertaining to a bent part as in flexion deformity.
Figure 1: The sites of the main nerve centres and descending pathways in the brain and spinal cord that control voluntary movement, represented in diagrammatic sections.

flexion

a movement which decreases the joint angle between two ventral surfaces of the body, e.g. bending the elbow or knee, tilting the head forwards. flexor muscles those with this action, e.g. biceps, hamstrings. Opposite of extension. Figure 1.

flexion

joint movement, causing the flexor aspects of the body parts it connects to move towards one another

flexion (flekˑ·shn),

n movement of a limb to decrease the angle of a joint.
Enlarge picture
Flexion.
flexion, bilateral sacral,
n condition in which the sacrum has rotated around a central transverse axis so that the sacral base moves forward between the bones of the pelvis. Also called
sacral base anterior.
flexion, craniosacral,
n movement characterized by ascending motion of the sphenobasilar symphysis and backward motion of the sacral base.
Enlarge picture
Flexion, craniosacral.
flexion, sacral,
n anterior movement of the sacral base relative to the hip bones.
flexion, SBS,
n rotation of the occipital and sphenoid bones in opposing directions about parallel transverse axes, thus resulting in superior positioning of the basilar portion of both bones and an increase in the posterior convexity between them. Also called
sphenobasilar synchondrosis (symphysis) flexion.

flex·ion

(flek'shŭn)
1. The act of flexing or bending.
2. The condition of being flexed or bent.
Synonym(s): open-packed position (2) .
[L. flecto, pp. flexus, to bend]

flexion (flek´shən),

n the bending of a joint between two skeletal members to decrease the angle between the members; opposite of extension.
flexion-extension reflex,

flexion

the act of bending or the condition of being bent.

flexion reflex
see flexor reflex.
References in periodicals archive ?
The biomimetic lumbar spine was validated under flexion and compression loading only.
In general, hip extensor activity is required during the majority of stance phase of step-over-step descent to counteract external flexion moment, with the exception of the period just before toe-off, when hip flexors are usually activated [19].
The 28% smaller elbow extension angle of the rear arm in the first step for the infielders, which was followed by a 13% smaller lead arm elbow flexion angle in the second step, was significantly different to those of the outfielders (p = 0.
Cadaver studies and in vivo experiments have found that the bending moment resisted by spinal ligaments and discs (passive tissues) increases exponentially when the spine is flexed beyond 80% of maximal in vivo flexion (Adams and Dolan 1991, Dolan et al 1994b).
This phenomenon was well demonstrated using dynamic extension followed by flexion with the transducer held firmly with respect to the medial epicondyle continuously monitoring the movement in the cubital tunnel.
The novel mobile bearing high flexion artificial knee implant was taken from the conceptual design from S Sivarasu & L Mathew (1).
Once the cane was adjusted, elbow flexion was measured with a universal goniometer while our subjects held the cane in standing.
When adolescents were sitting looking straight ahead they had a mean head flexion of 71 degrees (SD 10), neck flexion of 52 degrees (SD 9), craniocervical angle of 161 degrees (SD 12), cervicothoracic angle of 149 degrees (SD 8), trunk angle of 232 degrees (SD 11), lumbar angle of 129 degrees (SD 18), and pelvic tilt angle of 5 degrees (SD 15).
The wrist was placed in 10[degrees] extension, and the patient performed passive digital flexion and extension for 10 repetitions using the opposite hand.
Solicore develops, manufactures, and markets ultra-thin flexible lithium polymer batteries under its Flexion brand that serve the smart card, RFID and medical device markets.