flexibility


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flexibility

 [flek″sĭ-bil´ĭ-te]
the state of being unusually pliant.
waxy flexibility cerea flexibilitas.

flexibility

/flex·i·bil·i·ty/ (-ĭ-te) the quality of being readily bent without tendency to break.flex´ible
waxy flexibility  cerea flexibilitas.

flexibility

[flek′sibil′i·tē]
Etymology: L, flectere, to bend
the quality of being readily bent without breaking.

flexibility

Sports medicine The ability of a muscle or extremity to relax and yield to stretch and stress forces; the ROM of a joint, affected by muscles, tendons, ligaments, bones, and periarticular structures Factors influencing Age, sex–♀ are generally more flexible–and prior level and type of activity

flex·i·bil·i·ty

(fleks'i-bil'i-tē)
Range of motion about a joint dependent on the condition of surrounding structures.
See: range of motion, stretching

flexibility

the range of movement around a joint; dependent on a number of factors, including the size and shape of the bones, the ability of tendons to stretch, the condition of the ligaments, normal joint mechanics, soft tissue mobility and extensibility of the muscles. Good flexibility is beneficial in sport especially, for example, gymnastics and should be part of a sports-specific training programme and warm-up. However, flexibility training needs to be balanced with strength training to maintain joint stability. flexibility assessment can be made directly by measuring the angle of joint displacement using a goniometer, but this requires a skilful operator to achieve consistent results. More indirect measurements include the sit-and-reach or standing toe-touch tests. See also hypermobility.

flex·i·bil·i·ty

(fleks'i-bil'i-tē)
Joint range of motion dependent on condition of surrounding structures.

flexibility,

n the property of elastic deformation under loading.

flexibility

the state of being unusually pliant.

Patient discussion about flexibility

Q. Can a person be too flexible? I do deep knee bends for the past 3 years. Now a days I get tired soon. Can a person be too flexible?

A. Both a professional aerobic and a normal person can do such deep knee bends. Some evidence exists that an excessive level of flexibility can result in a decreased degree of joint stability. In reality, a trade-off between flexibility and stability appears to exist. This decrease in joint stability is particularly evident when the flexibility increase is the result of lengthening the connective tissue structures that stabilize a particular joint. Deep knee bends, may increase the range of motion (ROM) of the knee joint to the point where the knee becomes more susceptible to chronic or acute instability. As such, an individual's ROM for each joint should be determined by the demands of the individual. It should be noted that an excessive ROM for a given joint could result in decreased stability and a greater potential for injury.

Q. can an Adult be physically more flexible than children? If an adult who is flexible, can he be physically more flexible than children?

A. There are lots of difference in the flexibility of the bones of children and adults. Adults can be physically more flexible than children if they have always been flexible as a result of conditioning, or engaging in sports or exercises.

More discussions about flexibility
References in periodicals archive ?
Direct methods measure the flexibility of static Indirect methods measure the flexibility of static Procedure sit and brush with a traditional box Procedure sit and brush with modified box Goniometric test method (goniometer)
A majority of employees (62%) continue to cite obstacles to work life flexibility with the number of employees noting their workloads increased/they had no time rising from 29% in 2011 to 37% in 2013.
Some researchers have posited a positive relationship between manufacturing flexibility and manufacturing performance (e.
Corporations that are willing to drive innovation by providing flexibility within their real estate portfolio and work environments, and learn from their actions, will adapt the quickest to the evolving business culture of today and in the future.
And he adds that state officials must talk to each other to see what the others are getting to get more flexibility, and thus, the changes are watering down the law's intent.
The flexibility of SATA tape drives is another benefit, ideal for non-mission critical, secondary and bulk storage applications.
While dancers are encouraged to make stretching part of their routine, studies suggest that trying to extend your flexibility beyond its range works best when you are not rehearsing or preparing for a performance.
Steel mini-storage units offer flexibility because they can be expanded to accommodate the growing needs of a business, and features like skylights and vents can be installed to provide adequate light and ventilation.
In addition, EasyPath FPGAs now support two design variations in a single device--typically one to assist in the customer's system diagnostic test and one for the actual application--further reducing costs and providing unmatched flexibility.
Flexibility refers to the range of motion of a joint or a series of joints that are influenced by muscles, ligaments, tendons, and bony structures.
We wanted to look at some flexibility in terms of adding other entities to our corporate structure and to have future access to capital if we need it," Johnson said.
Other elastomer applications, such as chemical protective gloves that need elastomeric flexibility for dexterity and tactile sensitivity, also require the material to act as a barrier to molecular diffusion.