flesh fly

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Related to flesh flies: House flies

flesh·flies

(flesh'flīz),
Members of the order Diptera, including Wohlfartia, Sarcophagia, and Parasarcophagia, which feed on feces and decaying meat and fish, the larvae (maggots) of which develop in putrefying or living tissues. Maggots of the latter group produce myiasis; these include screw-worms (both primary and secondary invaders); wool maggots of sheep; botflies or skin maggots of humans and domestic animals (including warble or heel flies); head or nasal botflies of sheep and goats, horses, camels, and deer; and horse botflies (or gadflies) the larvae of which develop in the lips (egg to larva(L2) and in the stomach (Giardia intestinalis) and duodenum (Giardia nasalis), where they mature, maturing from L2 to L3 stage, the latter being the stage at which they are ready to be discharged in the feces.
Synonym(s): flesh fly

flesh fly

n.
Any of various flies of the family Sarcophagidae whose larvae are parasitic in animal tissue or feed on carrion.

flesh fly

(flesh flī)
Genera of dipteran flies including Wohlfahrtia, Sarcophaga, and Parasarcophaga, which feed on feces and decaying meat or fish; can cause human disease.

flesh fly

Any one of the various flies in the genus Sarcophaga . These flies lay their eggs in wounds or sores. In some cases, such as the grey flesh flies, Wohlfahrtia , the larvae will even invade the unbroken skin causing severe damage to underlying tissues.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the experiment two types batches "10" and "50" of fruit and flesh flies were used to analyse pupation site preference.
Several species of blowflies and flesh flies transport a variety of gastrointestinal pathogens and are carrier of number of diseases.
Larval and pupal behavior of blow and flesh flies was observed by many investigaters (Goff, 2000; Feng et al 2002; Gomes et al.
Goff (2000) pointed out that blow flies arrived within minutes to several hours after death depending on environmental conditions but flesh flies arrived at the same time or several hours after blow flies.
Behavior and biology of blow flies (lucilia sinensis) and flesh flies (Sarcophagi orientalis and Sarcophagi josephi).
The relationship between flesh flies overall abundance and temperature suggests that both variables are positively correlated given that the higher numerical peaks are achieved in late spring and in summer.
It would be suggested that the highest abundance of flesh flies recorded in spring-summer and early fall in the RECS may be due to this region wider thermal differences between summer and winter.
Despite the above comments, the lowest temperatures recorded during the winter in RECS did not seem to be a total restriction to flesh flies activity, given Sarcophagidae were recorded in all samples.
The higher numerical occurrence of flesh flies associated to dog faeces than to cow liver agrees with recently studies undertaken in the RECS (Mariluis et al.