flavonoid


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flavonoid

/fla·vo·noid/ (fla´vah-noid) any of a group of compounds containing a characteristic aromatic nucleus and widely distributed in higher plants, often as a pigment; a subgroup with biological activity in mammals is the bioflavonoids.

flavonoid

Herbal medicine
Any of a family of yellow pigments which are chemically similar to tannins and somewhat similar in use; flavonoids have been used for bruising, hay fever and menorrhagia. 

Nutrition
A family of biologically active polyphenolic compounds found in fruits (in particular in the pulp thereof), vegetables, tea and red wine, which are potent antioxidants and effective platelet inhibitors; a flavonoid-rich diet may protect against atherosclerosis and platelet-mediated thrombosis, due to flavonoids’ platelet-inhibition.

flavonoid

Bioflavonoid Nutrition Any biologically-active polyphenol found in fruits, especially in the pulp, vegetables, tea, red wine, which are potent antioxidants and platelet inhibitors

fla·vo·noid

(flāvō-noyd)
Metabolite from plant matter.

Flavonoid

A food chemical that helps to limit oxidative damage to the body's cells, and protects against heart disease and cancer.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Professor Bowles said that they were measuring how flavonoids affected the production of inflammatory mediators by cells stimulated by microbial products.
Evidence for antiradical and antioxidant properties of four biologically active N,N-diethylaminoethyl ethers of flavaone oximes: a comparison with natural polyphenolic flavonoid rutin action.
Part of the reason for conflicting data on flavonoids may be due to questions on flavonoid intake and if the same compound affects people of different genders and ethnicities.
Phenolic compounds and flavonoids are important groups of secondary metabolites and bioactive products, are produced as a response to environmental pollution through improving defense mechanism of injured plants, are antioxidants capable of scavenging free superoxide radicals and as such, are crucial for plant growth and reproduction [18,6,11,1].
Because the inhibitory effects of hesperetin and naringenin were greater than those of the other natural flavonoids tested, the researchers decided to compare hesperetin and naringenin with the novel 7-O-butyl naringenin.
Researchers examined the relationship of the six main subclasses of flavonoids commonly consumed in the American diet-flavanones, anthocyanins, flavan-3-ols, flavonoid polymers, flavonols, and flavones--to the risk of ischemic, hemorrhagic, and total stroke.
In women, there was no relationship between overall flavonoid consumption and developing Parkinson's disease.
Compounds called flavonoids, powerful anti-oxidants known to benefit the heart and possibly reduce the risk of cancer, may help to keep the brain healthy in old age.
Flavonoid (II) was identified as quercetin 3-O-rhamnoside-7-O-glucoside by UV spectral analysis with the customary shift reagents, total acid hydrolysis which gave quercetin, D-glucose and L-rhamnose and electrospray mass spectrum (positive mode) which showed a quasimolecular ion [[M+H].
In this context, wogonin, a flavonoid derived from Japanese-Chinese traditional herbal medicines, has been reported to inhibit lipogenesis in hamster sebaceous glands [5].
The expanded flavonoid database supplements the more extensive National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, known as "SR19," which is widely used by researchers and nutrition professionals.
In another study presented at the meeting, women who consumed kaempferol, a flavonoid found in tea, broccoli, and kale, had a reduced risk for ovarian cancer, said Margaret Gates, a doctoral candidate at Harvard University, Boston.