flannelmouth

flannelmouth

(flăn′ĕl-mowth″)
A colloquial and disparaging term for a patient with dysarthria.
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, the flannelmouth sucker (Catostomus latipinnis), bluehead sucker (Catostomus discobolus), and white sucker (Catostomus commersonii) comprised 65-75% of the total catch in the upper Colorado River (Carter and others 1986).
Age and growth of bluehead suckers and flannelmouth suckers in headwater tributaries, Wyoming.
Introduced into the frigid, bottle-green waters below Glen Canyon Dam for the pleasure of sport fishermen, trout have become a threat to fish native to the Colorado River--humpback chubs, flannelmouth suckers, and bluehead suckers; they compete for food and prey on the young of these now rare or endangered species.
Non-listed species that will benefit from the plan include fish like the flannelmouth sucker (Catostomus latipinnis), the yellow-billed cuckoo (Coccyzus americanus), and other neotropical migratory birds and bats that use riparian habitats.
The result is that three of the warm-water fish species native to the Grand Canyon (the humpback chub, razorback sucker, and flannelmouth sucker) are either listed under the Endangered Species Act or considered candidates for listing.
124) The humpback chub and razorback sucker are both listed as endangered, while the flannelmouth sucker is a candidate species.
Hybridization of bluehead suckers with white (Catostomus commersonii), flannelmouth (Catos tomus latipinnis), and mountain suckers (Catostomus platyrhynchus) has been documented in the Colorado River Basin (McAda, 1977; Bower, 2005; Compton, 2007; N.
Distributions and habitat associations of bluehead suckers, flannelmouth suckers and roundtail chubs in the upper Muddy Creek watershed of southern Carbon County, Wyoming.
Bluehead suckers (Catostomus discobolus) and flannelmouth suckers (C.
Both bluehead suckers and flannelmouth suckers are native to the Green River drainage in Wyoming and are species of concern within the state.
Flannelmouth suckers move upstream to spawn, and then return downstream (Chart and Bergersen, 1992; Compton et al.
A recent population expansion of smallmouth bass in the Yampa River (33% of fish in our electric-seine samples, 2003-2007) occurred prior to our sampling and was concurrent with decline of small-bodied or juvenile native fishes including roundtail chub Gila robusta, speckled dace Rhinichthys osculus, bluehead sucker Catostomus discobolus, and flannelmouth sucker Catostomus latipinnis since 2001 (R.