flake

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flake

Cocaine, see there.

flake

an epidermal scale.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chapter 1 leads the reader through the value of stone artefact studies, the mechanics and techniques of flaking, the properties of flakeable stone, methods of distinguishing artefactual from naturally flaked lithic material and finally the products of flaking.
An examination of the debris on my own knapping floor suggests that waisting is not necessarily diagnostic of flakes initiated by bending fractures and, like the waisting on the conchoidally flaked piece in Fig.
The use of the term 'Kimberley point' to describe a number of different point forms, ranging from non-invasive marginally retouched uniface points which were manufactured in the Kimberley region (Figure 1), to finely worked symmetrical invasively pressure flaked points with serrated margins, manufactured in areas as far away from the Kimberley as Rottnest Island, has suggested the need for clearer definitions to distinguish between what appear to be temporally and spatially distinct artefact forms.
Wanji bifaces are not invasively flaked and were only pressure flaked in the contact period, and can be clearly distinguished from glass Kimberley points of the contact period in that the pressure flaking is short and occurs only at the margins to provide plan symmetry to the artefact.
Key features of these specimens include flaked surfaces running in two or more directions and ripple marks, cracks and protrusions clearly resulting from the impact required to detach flakes from stone.
Sixteen bifacially flaked chert cobbles were recovered from the Camooweal project area (Moore 2003c) (Figure 8).
Yet thousands of flaked stones excavated from several pits appear to have been modified by humans and, according to a preliminary analysis in a book edited by Bryan (New Evidence for the Pleistocene Peopling of the Americas, Center for the Study of Early Man, University of Maine, 1986), some of the stones are from a layer of earth that is at least 200,000 years old.