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flag

Lab medicine A determined value on a diagnostic test at or above which a certain action is taken; eg fasting glucose > 7.8 mmol/L–US: > 140 mg/dL, is a flag for notifying the attending physician, who might not otherwise suspect DM. See Decision level, Panic value, Red flag.

flag

(flag)
medical transcription Warning or caution by the transcriptionist to the author of a report, pointing out problems (e.g., missing date, dictation errors, equipment problems, or potentially inflammatory remarks). Flags contribute to risk management.

flag

(flag)
medical transcription warning or caution by the transcriptionist to the author of a report, pointing out problems (e.g., missing date, dictation errors, equipment problems, or potentially inflammatory remarks).

flag,

n 1. a type of indicator used for identification.
2. a label that signals the occurrence of some medical condition (“red flag”).

flag

see udder edema.
References in periodicals archive ?
With the exception of the high-volume Route 148, the police chief is OK with using a flagger throughout town, she said.
CUTLINE: Flagger Michael Darcy uses a radio to coordinate traffic flow with a second flagger working at the Rt.
Of the remaining 166 communities polled, 30 said they use flaggers in conjunction with police details.
Steven Baddour, D-Methuen, said the administration has placed civilian flaggers at the top of the prevailing wage scale.
Most of the work on the bridge replacement will be done behind concrete barriers, and many flaggers will not be needed, she said.
Patrick and enacted by the Legislature last fall, only requires the state to use flaggers on projects on which it is the awarding authority, and then only on work sites that are considered to have low traffic volume at low speeds.
The problem, he said, is that the Barre police earn $38 per hour for details, $2 an hour less than the flaggers.
In vowing to continue use of civilian flaggers where appropriate, Highway Commissioner Louisa Paiewonsky properly signaled the end of the era of raiding the public purse for special-interest perks.
For safety reasons, local police are notified in advance when and where civilian flaggers will be working at road sites, she said.
A one-lane bypass road, controlled by flaggers (day and night) will continue until the work is complete.
From the start of the alleged reform, cities and towns were given the option of adopting flaggers for municipal work.
One lane of traffic will be maintained at all times with flaggers.