flagellum


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flagellum

 [flah-jel´um] (pl. flagel´la) (L.)
a long, mobile, whiplike appendage arising from a basal body at the surface of a cell, serving as a locomotor organelle; in eukaryotic cells, flagella contain nine pairs of microtubules arrayed around a central pair; in bacteria, they contain tightly wound strands of flagellin.

fla·gel·lum

, pl.

fla·gel·la

(flă-jel'ŭm, -ă),
A whiplike locomotory organelle of constant structural arrangement consisting of nine double peripheral microtubules and two single central microtubules; it arises from a deeply staining basal granule, often connected to the nucleus by a fiber, the rhizoplast. Although characteristic of the protozoan class Mastigophora, comparable structures are commonly found in many other groups, for example, in sperm.
[L. dim. of flagrum, a whip]

flagellum

/fla·gel·lum/ (flah-jel´um) pl. flagel´la   [L.] a long, mobile, whiplike appendage arising from a basal body at the surface of a cell, serving as a locomotor organelle; in eukaryotic cells, flagella contain nine pairs of microtubules arrayed around a central pair; in bacteria, they contain tightly wound strands of flagellin.

flagellum

(flə-jĕl′əm)
n. pl. fla·gella (-jĕl′ə)
A long, whiplike appendage that functions as a cellular organ of locomotion, found in certain bacteria, protozoans, and specialized eukaryotic cells such as motile sperm.

flagellum

[flajel′əm] pl. flagella
Etymology: L, whip
a long, hairlike projection that extends from some unicellular organisms and from the sperm of animals, algae, and some plants. Flagellar motion is a complex, whiplike undulation that propels cells through a fluid environment.

fla·gel·lum

, pl. flagella (flă-jel'ŭm, -ă)
A whiplike locomotory organelle of constant structural arrangement consisting of nine double peripheral microtubules and two single central microtubules; it arises from a deeply staining basal granule, often connected to the nucleus by a fiber, the rhizoplast.
[L. dim. of flagrum, a whip]

flagellum

A long, whip-like, filamentary process used for locomotion and present on a number of PROTOZOA and other organism, especially the class Mastigophora that includes Trichomonas vaginalis , a common cause of vaginal discharge, and Trypanosma species that cause TRYPANOSOMIASIS.

flagellum

(pl. flagella) a fine, hair-like process of a cell, associated with locomotion in unicellular organisms. The eukaryotic flagellum is similar in structure to the CILIUM; however, it can be distinguished from cilia by its occurrence in smaller numbers and by generally being longer. The prokaryotic flagellum has a simpler structure, consisting of a filament made out of protein subunits called flagellin, arranged in several chains to form a helix around a hollow core. The filament is anchored through a rotating hook and a basal body to the bacterial cell membrane and cell wall. The number of flagella may vary from one to many, depending on the bacterial species. flagella occur in the flagellates, in most motile gametes, in ZOOSPORES, in BACTERIA and occasionally in METAZOANS, as in the ENDODERM of some COELENTERATES.

fla·gel·lum

, pl. flagella (flă-jel'ŭm, -ă)
Whiplike locomotory organelle of constant structural arrangement consisting of nine double peripheral microtubules and two single central microtubules.
[L. dim. of flagrum, a whip]

flagellum

pl. flagella [L.] a long, mobile, whiplike appendage arising from a basal body at the surface of a cell, serving as a locomotor organelle; the only known example in biology of a rotatory motion. In eukaryotic cells, flagella contain nine pairs of microtubules arrayed around a central pair; in bacteria, they contain tightly wound strands of flagellin.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sensilla on the antennal flagellum of Sirexnoctilio (Hymenoptera: Siricidae).
During the incubation, there was a shift in the site of phosphotyrosine-specific fluorescence from the head of sperm to the flagellum, and at 3 h incubation, 72% sperm had tyrosine phosphorylated proteins at the whole head and both the principal and midpiece of the flagellum (Figure 2b, c, d; Table 2).
First, there exist flagella with forms simpler than the one Behe cites, so it is not necessary for all those components to be present for a flagellum to work.
1984), reported that the flagellum was rather short in comparison with that of the cyprinid fishes and two lateral ridges formed by the plasma membrane extended from the flagellum.
As the microbe gets older, its flagellum falls off, and a stalk grows in its place.
In the western Atlantic Ocean, Perez-Farfante (1969, 1970, 1971a) described diagnostic characters of the genus Farfantepenaeus that allowed identification of individuals in the range of 8-20 mm CL (carapace length) on the basis of the following morphological features: 1) changes in the structure of the petasma and thelycum; 2) absence or presence of distomarginal spines in the ventral costa of the petasma; 3) the ratio between the keel height and the sulcus width of the sixth abdominal somite; 4) the shape and position of the rostrum with respect to the segments and flagellum of the antennule; and 5) the ratio between rostrum length (RL) and carapace length (RL/CL).
The parasite that causes the disease and kills thousands cannot survive in the human bloodstream without the use of its flagellum, a protein "tail" that allows it to swim, according to a study published in Nature magazine this week.
He reiterates the claim that the flagellum of microorganisms and the mammalian eye represent cases of irreducible complexity (i.
Structures such as the bacterial flagellum, he argued, could not be assembled gradually through a series of functional intermediate forms--all of their many components had to come together at once.