Fixed

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Designed to operate in the same spot over a long period of time, i.e., not mobile, as in, ‘fixed hospital’ or ‘fixed laboratory’
References in classic literature ?
Certainly he had gazed at times very fixedly before him with the Landfall's vigilant look, this sea-captain seated incongruously in a deep-backed chair.
Presently he drew himself up and looked fixedly out of the window, apparently turning over some new idea in his mind.
When I first cast my eyes on her, she sat looking fixedly down, her chin resting on her hand, and she did not change her attitude till I commenced the lesson.
At the same time, to stare fixedly about one is unbecoming; for that, again, is ungentlemanly, seeing that no spectacle is worth an open stare--are no spectacles in the world which merit from a gentleman too pronounced an inspection.
Having set his mind fixedly on the project of breaking up the establishment at Astoria, in the current year, M'Dougal was sorely disappointed at finding that Messrs.
The old marquise, who was leaning back in her chair with a hand clasping the knob of each arm, looked at him fixedly without moving.
The Italian then looked fixedly at Madame Servin, who said, without the slightest change of face:--
For a time silence reigned, and the two stood looking fixedly at each other.
The gypsy gracefully raised herself upright upon the officer's saddle, placed both hands upon the young man's shoulders, and gazed fixedly at him for several seconds, as though enchanted with his good looks and with the aid which he had just rendered her.
He gazed upon it long and fixedly, estimated the prodigious labor that had been bestowed upon it, and, not being able to find any recompense sufficiently great for this Herculean effort, he passed his arm round the painter's neck and embraced him.
Prince Hippolyte stood close to the pretty, pregnant princess, and stared fixedly at her through his eyeglass.
To show what was my state, take the case of the very gentleman-like man whom I detected gazing fixedly at me, or so I thought, just as I had drawn valiantly near the door.