fixative


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fixative

 [fik´sah-tiv]
an agent used in preserving a histologic or pathologic specimen so as to maintain the normal structure of its constituent elements.

fix·a·tive

(fik'să-tiv),
1. Serving to fix, bind, or make firm or stable.
See also: fluid, solution.
2. A substance used for the preservation of gross and histologic specimens of tissue, or individual cells, usually by denaturing and precipitating or cross-linking the protein constituents.
See also: fluid, solution.

fixative

/fix·a·tive/ (fik´sit-iv) an agent used in preserving a histological or pathological specimen so as to maintain the normal structure of its constituent elements.

fixative

(fĭk′sə-tĭv)
n.
Something that fixes, protects, or preserves, especially:
a. A liquid preservative applied to artwork, such as watercolor paintings or charcoal drawings.
b. A solution used to preserve and harden fresh tissue for microscopic examination.
c. A liquid mixed with perfume to prevent rapid evaporation.

fix′a·tive adj.

fixative

[fik′sətiv]
Etymology: L, figere, to fasten
1 any substance used to bind, glue, or stabilize.
2 any substance used to preserve gross or histological specimens of tissue for later examination.

fix·a·tive

(fik'să-tiv)
1. Serving to fix, bind, or make firm or stable.
2. A substance used for the preservation of gross and histologic specimens of tissue, or individual cells, usually by denaturing and precipitating or cross-linking the protein constituents.
See also: fluid, solution

fix·a·tive

(fik'să-tiv)
1. Serving to fix, bind, or make firm or stable.
2. A substance used for the preservation of gross and histologic specimens.

fixative

(fik´sətiv),
n 1. a substance used to bind, glue, or stabilize.
2. a substance used to preserve gross or histologic specimens of tissue for later examination.

fixative

an agent such as formalin used in preserving a histological or pathological specimen so as to maintain the normal structure of its constituent elements.
References in periodicals archive ?
For 21 cases, we processed entire MLBC material from the liquid fixative for cell blocks preparation without preparing LBC smears, to obtain adequate material for cell blocks (Table 1).
If molecular testing may be in the future for a given tissue sample, pathologists can know not to leave the sample in fixative longer than necessary.
As detailed above, the following preanalytical factors have published effects on the analysis of at least 1 type of analyte in FFPE tissue: PMI, cold ischemia time, specimen size, fixative buffer, fixative delivery method, fixative temperature and duration, decalcification, block storage, section thickness, and section storage (Table 1).
Edwards said the system enables the application of fixatives, strippable coatings, reagents and similar materials "to areas where there is no manned access.
Sometimes spray fixative is also used particularly for pap smears.
Now it's easy to forget those who had developed a passion for the physicality of the photographic object, the impossibly bulky cameras, the intoxicating smell of the darkroom fixative.
Long periods of fixative penetration are usually required; this can cause time-dependent artifacts such as shrinkage and extraction of cellular components.
Because RNAlater is readily used for field sample transportation, laboratory assistants could falsely interpret RNAlater as a disinfectant fixative.
The chemicals are added to meat products as a preservative, an antimicrobial agent and a colour fixative.
In 81%, the duct tape would not stick; 32% used extra fixative.
Although highly priced, it still is used to prepare commercial perfume because it strengthens other scents, and is a fixative which helps maintain the scent longer.
18 x 24" (46 x 61 cm) white drawing paper, fixative, assorted tools and media