fixative


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fixative

 [fik´sah-tiv]
an agent used in preserving a histologic or pathologic specimen so as to maintain the normal structure of its constituent elements.

fix·a·tive

(fik'să-tiv),
1. Serving to fix, bind, or make firm or stable.
See also: fluid, solution.
2. A substance used for the preservation of gross and histologic specimens of tissue, or individual cells, usually by denaturing and precipitating or cross-linking the protein constituents.
See also: fluid, solution.

fixative

/fix·a·tive/ (fik´sit-iv) an agent used in preserving a histological or pathological specimen so as to maintain the normal structure of its constituent elements.

fixative

(fĭk′sə-tĭv)
n.
Something that fixes, protects, or preserves, especially:
a. A liquid preservative applied to artwork, such as watercolor paintings or charcoal drawings.
b. A solution used to preserve and harden fresh tissue for microscopic examination.
c. A liquid mixed with perfume to prevent rapid evaporation.

fix′a·tive adj.

fixative

[fik′sətiv]
Etymology: L, figere, to fasten
1 any substance used to bind, glue, or stabilize.
2 any substance used to preserve gross or histological specimens of tissue for later examination.

fix·a·tive

(fik'să-tiv)
1. Serving to fix, bind, or make firm or stable.
2. A substance used for the preservation of gross and histologic specimens of tissue, or individual cells, usually by denaturing and precipitating or cross-linking the protein constituents.
See also: fluid, solution

fix·a·tive

(fik'să-tiv)
1. Serving to fix, bind, or make firm or stable.
2. A substance used for the preservation of gross and histologic specimens.

fixative

(fik´sətiv),
n 1. a substance used to bind, glue, or stabilize.
2. a substance used to preserve gross or histologic specimens of tissue for later examination.

fixative

an agent such as formalin used in preserving a histological or pathological specimen so as to maintain the normal structure of its constituent elements.
References in periodicals archive ?
The first, of course, is the solution: why not substitute some other fixative agent which doesn't damage nucleic acids for formalin?
Again, with respect to deparaffinization, we followed the official recommendations given to us with the HOPE fixatives.
Bufferized OsO4 is one of the most important fixatives for the stabilization of various tissues.
Vagisil is back on National TV from Mid August for four weeks while Sea-bond, the Denture Fixative Seals is back on TV for the second time this year with a 7 week campaign from August 1st.
The fructan-enriched snack had an overall acceptability score that was similar to the traditional snack flavored with a fatty fixative agent.
Previous firm Aramark sold around 1,000 items including denture fixative, biscuits, crisps, cans of soft drink, toothpaste and tobacco.
When freezing facilities for biological materials are not available, there is a need for fixatives that allow the examination of single samples for morphological as well as antigen, antibody, or nucleic acid analyses.
18 x 24" (46 x 61 cm) white drawing paper, fixative, assorted tools and media
Removing the fixative coatings--many of which are designed to peel off in large, easily disposable pieces--will clean away radioactive particles that had adhered.
They developed an all-purpose fixative suitable for both routine histology and most diagnostic electron microscopic applications.
Dipped in milky liquid latex, the old underwear, dresses, and aprons were transformed into smooth, flat surfaces, the fixative coming to resemble a second skin as it aged.