fixate

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fixate

(fĭk′sāt′)
v. fix·ated, fix·ating, fix·ates
v.tr.
Psychology
a. To cause to become emotionally attached in an immature or pathological manner.
b. In classical psychoanalysis, to cause (the libido) to be arrested at an early stage of psychosexual development.
v.intr.
1. To focus the eyes or attention.
2. Psychology
a. To become attached to a person or thing in an immature or pathological way; form a fixation.
b. To be arrested at an early stage of psychosexual development.

fixate, fixated

See fixation.

fixate

Ophthalmology
To focus one’s eyes (gaze) on a particular point in space.

Psychology
To focus one’s attention on a particular thing, person or idea.
References in periodicals archive ?
For the most part, "jazz" has never looked back to the past as "classical" music has - fixated upon finer and finer degrees of perfection in the interpretation of past, "classic" treasures.
There are some obvious advantages to this strategy, not the least being that a citizenry fixated upon the fate of John Bobbitt's penis and Nancy Kerrigan's knee isn't going to have much in the way of mental resources left for the major issues of the day.
To be sure, very few homosexuals are pedophiles, and heterosexuals can also be fixated upon children.
She argues convincingly that Vietnam films have fixated upon the "noble grunts" (American foot soldiers), thereby slighting the U.
CyberJudas breaks into the high-level computer game arena at a time when America is fixated upon politics, strategy and the American presidency.
A veteran from the First World War, whose mind was wracked by the horrors he had witnessed as much as it was fixated upon making as much money as he could unlawfully, Tommy Shelby was an absorbing character.
He said: "I find it very odd that we are fixated upon presidential style debates in a country which has a parliamentary democracy.
The world population is growing by the population of Wales every week, with China building a high-emission coal-powered power station every week, but Plaid is fixated upon a "green" economy in this tiny country.
Replete with stories from the last century of Iranian history, Hatami's oeuvre is fixated upon how there can be no return; all his movies are just a sterilized ambition to return to his ideal context.