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fit

(fit),
1. An attack of an acute disease or the sudden appearance of some symptom, such as coughing.
2. A convulsion.
3. (plural) epilepsy.
4. In dentistry, the adaptation of any dental restoration, for example, of an inlay to the cavity preparation in a tooth, or of a denture to its basal seat.
[A.S. fitt]

fit

(fit)
1. seizure (2).
2. the adaptation of one structure into another.

fit

(fĭt)
n.
1. Medicine
a. A seizure or convulsion, especially one caused by epilepsy.
b. The sudden appearance of a symptom such as coughing or sneezing.
2. A sudden outburst of emotion: a fit of jealousy.
3. A sudden period of vigorous activity.

fit

1 nontechnical, a paroxysm or seizure.
2 the sudden onset of an episode of symptoms, such as a fit of coughing.
3 the manner in which one surface is aligned to another, such as the alignment of a denture with the gingiva and jaw.

fit

Dentistry
verb To adapt a denture to its basal seat in the jaw.

Medspeak
adjective In good health; as in, “Mr Peterson is a fit 82-year-old who came to my clinic complaining of right-sided weakness.”

noun A paroxysm—e.g., a tussive fit.

Neurology
noun Convulsion, seizure.
   
Sexology
adjective Sexually attractive; as in, “That person looks fit.”

fit

(fit)
1. An attack of an acute disease or the sudden appearance of some symptom, such as coughing.
2. A convulsion.
3. See: epilepsy
4. dentistry The adaptation of any dental restoration, e.g., of an inlay to the cavity preparation in a tooth, or of a denture to its basal seat.
[A.S. fitt]

fit

A sudden acute attack of any disorder, especially an epileptic seizure.

fit

(fit)
1. In dentistry, adaptation of any dental restoration, e.g., of an inlay to the cavity preparation in a tooth, or of a denture to its basal seat.
2. A convulsion.
3. Epileptic seizure.
[A.S. fitt]

fit,

n an adaptation of any dental restoration. An adaptation of a denture to its basal seat, a clasp to a tooth, an inlay to a cavity preparation.

fit

1. an episode characterized by inappropriate and involuntary motor activity. In humans there are similar psychic disturbances as well. The most common manifestation is a convulsion; similar involuntary movements of restricted parts of the body would also fit this description. Called also convulsion, seizure.
2. the quality of similarity between two sets of data.

goodness of fit
the degree of similarity between two sets of data, e.g. the frequencies of two attributes; a test for the significance of the similarity.

Patient discussion about fit

Q. I mean what this fitness is all about….. I know nutritious diet is important for good health but why is the need for fitness …..I mean what this fitness is all about…..

A. Fitness can help you live longer and has been proven to help the body, muscles, bones not age as much as if you were inactive...

Q. What does the concept of fitness stands for?

A. Dagmar said it well.

Q. what does fitness include?

A. The term 'fitness' refers to general fitness (a state of health and well-being) and specific fitness (the ability to perform specific aspects of sports or occupations).Physical fitness is the functioning of the heart, blood vessels, lungs, and muscles to function at optimum efficiency, therefore, it is now defined as the body’s ability to function efficiently.

More discussions about fit
References in periodicals archive ?
And the assistance of the Greek philosophy maketh not the truth more powerful; but, inasmuch as it weakens the contrary arguments of the sophists and repels the veiled attacks against the truth, it has been fitly called the hedge and fence of the vine.
those of their children whom nature hath fitly formed and disposed to become useful instruments for the public.
Afterwards, 27-year-old Du Bois sent Washington a warm personal note, praising the Atlanta address as "a word fitly spoken.
The aim of this volume is to fitly describe and interpret the excavations carried out by Ugolini on the site of the ancient theatre (1928-1936).
Her life is hushed and mild, Laid in God's knowledge-ever unenticed From God, and in the end thus fitly priced.
O]ne finds in the Book of Proverbs the meditation that "[a] word fitly spoken is like an apple of gold in a frame of silver.
to be characterised more fitly as a barrack', claiming that foreigners who had been to 'Munich, Turin, Dresden, Florence, Paris or Rome, were astonished at the way art in Britain was looked after'.
13) While its direct influence might be questioned, the Anthology certainly was significant as an historic justification for writing religious epigrams, llaomas Drant's translation of Nazianzus in 1568, Epigrams and sentences spirituall in vers, provides some indication of the means by which this example became known: "Perusing (right honorable) some of the Germaine wryters, and delighting in their pretie & wittie verses, which to the texts and common places of holy scriptures they fitly have applied: I found no sayinges in them of a more quicke and godly sence, then those whiche they bringe oute of Gregorie Nazanzen, a Doctour of the Greeke churche very wel learned, and very eloquent" (sig.
Granted, it was the only fitly reusable "space plane" for several decades (even the space shuttle cannot make that claim), but readers get the message after the first few pages.
Fitly percent of the top 40 nonwoven companies worldwide are European, which speaks for the talent and industrial know-how of the nonwovens sector in the region.
Fitly years from now some youngster reading this issue as I did that first issue 50 years ago may very well be writing about the 100th anniversary of GUNS along with the 100th anniversary of Ruger's centerfire Single Actions.