fit

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fit

(fit),
1. An attack of an acute disease or the sudden appearance of some symptom, such as coughing.
2. A convulsion.
3. (plural) epilepsy.
4. In dentistry, the adaptation of any dental restoration, for example, of an inlay to the cavity preparation in a tooth, or of a denture to its basal seat.
[A.S. fitt]

fit

(fit)
1. seizure (2).
2. the adaptation of one structure into another.

fit

(fĭt)
n.
1. Medicine
a. A seizure or convulsion, especially one caused by epilepsy.
b. The sudden appearance of a symptom such as coughing or sneezing.
2. A sudden outburst of emotion: a fit of jealousy.
3. A sudden period of vigorous activity.

fit

1 nontechnical, a paroxysm or seizure.
2 the sudden onset of an episode of symptoms, such as a fit of coughing.
3 the manner in which one surface is aligned to another, such as the alignment of a denture with the gingiva and jaw.

fit

Dentistry
verb To adapt a denture to its basal seat in the jaw.

Medspeak
adjective In good health; as in, “Mr Peterson is a fit 82-year-old who came to my clinic complaining of right-sided weakness.”

noun A paroxysm—e.g., a tussive fit.

Neurology
noun Convulsion, seizure.
   
Sexology
adjective Sexually attractive; as in, “That person looks fit.”

fit

(fit)
1. An attack of an acute disease or the sudden appearance of some symptom, such as coughing.
2. A convulsion.
3. See: epilepsy
4. dentistry The adaptation of any dental restoration, e.g., of an inlay to the cavity preparation in a tooth, or of a denture to its basal seat.
[A.S. fitt]

fit

A sudden acute attack of any disorder, especially an epileptic seizure.

fit

(fit)
1. In dentistry, adaptation of any dental restoration, e.g., of an inlay to the cavity preparation in a tooth, or of a denture to its basal seat.
2. A convulsion.
3. Epileptic seizure.
[A.S. fitt]

fit,

n an adaptation of any dental restoration. An adaptation of a denture to its basal seat, a clasp to a tooth, an inlay to a cavity preparation.

fit

1. an episode characterized by inappropriate and involuntary motor activity. In humans there are similar psychic disturbances as well. The most common manifestation is a convulsion; similar involuntary movements of restricted parts of the body would also fit this description. Called also convulsion, seizure.
2. the quality of similarity between two sets of data.

goodness of fit
the degree of similarity between two sets of data, e.g. the frequencies of two attributes; a test for the significance of the similarity.

Patient discussion about fit

Q. I mean what this fitness is all about….. I know nutritious diet is important for good health but why is the need for fitness …..I mean what this fitness is all about…..

A. Fitness can help you live longer and has been proven to help the body, muscles, bones not age as much as if you were inactive...

Q. What does the concept of fitness stands for?

A. Dagmar said it well.

Q. what does fitness include?

A. The term 'fitness' refers to general fitness (a state of health and well-being) and specific fitness (the ability to perform specific aspects of sports or occupations).Physical fitness is the functioning of the heart, blood vessels, lungs, and muscles to function at optimum efficiency, therefore, it is now defined as the body’s ability to function efficiently.

More discussions about fit
References in periodicals archive ?
Nothing could have been spoken more fitly to my sensibilities, filial or liiterary," he avowed.
Furthermore, given that German cockroaches are associated with dirty or fitly conditions most people do not want to be identified with their infestations and consequently, occasional cockroach infestations prompt the routine preventive use of pesticides.
Heider recently ordered new, fitly automatic control systems from Q.
Imagine this: You are sitting in a meeting; you follow the conversation fitly, absorbed, noticing that a few of your colleagues whose eves are focused on incoming texts are less connected.
But civilization is itself but a mixed good, if not far more a corrupting influence, the hectic of disease, not the bloom of health, and a nation so distinguished more fitly to be called a varnished than a polished people, where this civilization is not grounded in cultivation, in the harmonious development of those qualities and features that characterize our humanity.
There is another more civil philosophy, which knows its own role, and adopting itself to it, keeps up its own part fitly and with decorum in the play that is in hand.
Avishai also argues convincingly that Howe could not fitly appreciate the novel because he was limited by the conventional political lens through which he analyzed the book.
That is why the last attempt to destroy Israel by the Arab countries was the Yom Kippur war of 1973 before Israel was fitly nuclear capable.
This chapter includes the well-known phrase in verse 11, likening a "word fitly spoken" to the beauty of a sculpted golden apple artistically crafted against a background of silver.
Yet, paternalists often forget that policymaking itself is a political process given their implicit assumptions that policies are crafted by benevolent, perfectly rational, and fitly informed bureaucrats.
Then one of the sisters addressed her: "Minerva, goddess who fitly could join our musical company, had not your own fine qualities marked you out for yet greater tasks, your praise of our arts and our home is truly deserved.