fission

(redirected from fissions)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to fissions: induced fission

fission

 [fish´un]
1. the act of splitting.
2. asexual reproduction in which the cell divides into two (binary fission) or more (multiple fission) daughter parts, each of which becomes an individual organism.
3. nuclear fission; the splitting of the atomic nucleus, with release of energy.
binary fission the halving of the nucleus and then of the cytoplasm of the cell, as occurs in protozoa.

fis·sion

(fish'ŭn),
1. The act of splitting, for example, amitotic division of a cell or its nucleus.
2. Splitting of the nucleus of an atom.
[L. fissio, a cleaving, fr. findo, pp. fissus, to cleave]

fission

/fis·sion/ (fish´un)
1. the act of splitting.
2. asexual reproduction in which the cell divides into two (binary f.) or more (multiple f.) daughter parts, each of which becomes an individual organism.
3. nuclear fission; the splitting of the atomic nucleus, with release of energy.

fission

(fĭsh′ən, fĭzh′-)
n.
1. The act or process of splitting into parts.
2. Biology An asexual reproductive process in which a unicellular organism divides into two or more independently maturing daughter cells.
v. fis·sioned, fis·sioning, fis·sions

fission

[fish′ən]
Etymology: L, fissio, splitting
1 the act or process of splitting or breaking up into two or more parts.
2 a type of asexual reproduction common in bacteria, protozoa, and other simpler forms of life in which the cell divides into two or more equal components, each of which eventually develops into a complete organism. Kinds of fission are binary fission and multiple fission.
3 (in physics) the splitting of the nucleus of an atom and subsequent release of energy. Also called nuclear fission.

fis·sion

(fish'ŭn)
1. The act of splitting, e.g., amitotic division of a cell or its nucleus.
2. Splitting of the nucleus of an atom.
[L. fissio, a cleaving, fr. findo, pp. fissus, to cleave]

fission

Splitting into parts.
1. The asexual reproductive process by which a single-celled organism or a single cell in a multicellular organism splits into two daughter cells.
2. An atomic event in which the nucleus of an atom splits into fragments, with the loss of a small quantity of matter and the evolution of radiational energy of at least 100 million electron volts (mV).

fission

see BINARY FISSION.

fis·sion

(fish'ŭn)
1. The act of splitting, e.g., a mitotic division of a cell or its nucleus.
2. Splitting of the nucleus of an atom.
[L. fissio, a cleaving, fr. findo, pp. fissus, to cleave]

fission (fish´ən),

n the splitting of a nucleus into two fragments. Fission may occur spontaneously or may be induced artificially. In addition to the fission fragments, particulate radiation energy and gamma rays are usually produced during fission.
fission, nuclear, products,
n.pl the elements (nuclides) or compounds resulting from nuclear fission.
fission products,
n.pl the nuclides produced by the fission of a heavy-element nuclide.

fission

1. the act of splitting.
2. asexual reproduction in which the cell divides into two (binary fission) or more (multiple fission) daughter parts, each of which becomes an individual organism.
3. nuclear fission; the splitting of the atomic nucleus, with release of energy.
References in periodicals archive ?
McIntyre's design builds on work at Argonne National Laboratory and Idaho National Laboratory as well as the PRIDE facility in South Korea which demonstrated the process for extracting the fuel and separating the transuranic elements and fission products in molten salt.
But earlier proposals for accelerator-driven subcritical fission faced the problem that there was no known way to deliver the necessary proton beam power to a core.
In nuclear fission, the nucleus splits into two fragments (daughter
From the fundamental research point of view, fission is not yet fully
There scientists discovered something startling: mineral evidence of a naturally occurring nuclear fission reactor that had spontaneously sprung to life almost 2 billion years ago and operated for hundreds of thousands of years.
SCIENCE FISSION "The first question is why [this Oklo reactor] didn't explode like human-made reactors sometimes do," Meshik says.
Spontaneous fusions have been seen in many taxa, including the Aloineae (Brandham, 1983) and Lycoris (Kurita, 1987c); and fissions, in such taxa as Hypochaeris (Parker, 1987), Nigella (Strid, 1968), Tradescantia (Jones & Kenton, 1984), and Vicia (Schubert & Reiger, 1990).
Seen against the background of the karyotype patterns in Crocus in general and that of the 2n = 24 members of the same species, one must agree with Brighton that successive centric fissions are responsible for the observed variation.
The recent discoveries trace their roots to Soviet fission research during the 1960s.
The transuranics are all inherently unstable, subject to spontaneous fission or radioactive decay -- as is uranium, atomic number 92, the heaviest element known to exist in detectable amounts on earth.
The graphite "moderator' is used to slow down fissioning neutrons to an energy level that makes them more conducive to contribute in another fission reaction.
However, many physicists define fission as a mode of decay Using the term "decay" to describe fission is less specific than we could have been, but it's by no means a "fundamental conceptual error.