fission


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fission

 [fish´un]
1. the act of splitting.
2. asexual reproduction in which the cell divides into two (binary fission) or more (multiple fission) daughter parts, each of which becomes an individual organism.
3. nuclear fission; the splitting of the atomic nucleus, with release of energy.
binary fission the halving of the nucleus and then of the cytoplasm of the cell, as occurs in protozoa.

fis·sion

(fish'ŭn),
1. The act of splitting, for example, amitotic division of a cell or its nucleus.
2. Splitting of the nucleus of an atom.
[L. fissio, a cleaving, fr. findo, pp. fissus, to cleave]

fission

/fis·sion/ (fish´un)
1. the act of splitting.
2. asexual reproduction in which the cell divides into two (binary f.) or more (multiple f.) daughter parts, each of which becomes an individual organism.
3. nuclear fission; the splitting of the atomic nucleus, with release of energy.

fission

(fĭsh′ən, fĭzh′-)
n.
1. The act or process of splitting into parts.
2. Biology An asexual reproductive process in which a unicellular organism divides into two or more independently maturing daughter cells.
v. fis·sioned, fis·sioning, fis·sions

fission

[fish′ən]
Etymology: L, fissio, splitting
1 the act or process of splitting or breaking up into two or more parts.
2 a type of asexual reproduction common in bacteria, protozoa, and other simpler forms of life in which the cell divides into two or more equal components, each of which eventually develops into a complete organism. Kinds of fission are binary fission and multiple fission.
3 (in physics) the splitting of the nucleus of an atom and subsequent release of energy. Also called nuclear fission.

fis·sion

(fish'ŭn)
1. The act of splitting, e.g., amitotic division of a cell or its nucleus.
2. Splitting of the nucleus of an atom.
[L. fissio, a cleaving, fr. findo, pp. fissus, to cleave]

fission

Splitting into parts.
1. The asexual reproductive process by which a single-celled organism or a single cell in a multicellular organism splits into two daughter cells.
2. An atomic event in which the nucleus of an atom splits into fragments, with the loss of a small quantity of matter and the evolution of radiational energy of at least 100 million electron volts (mV).

fission

see BINARY FISSION.

fis·sion

(fish'ŭn)
1. The act of splitting, e.g., a mitotic division of a cell or its nucleus.
2. Splitting of the nucleus of an atom.
[L. fissio, a cleaving, fr. findo, pp. fissus, to cleave]

fission (fish´ən),

n the splitting of a nucleus into two fragments. Fission may occur spontaneously or may be induced artificially. In addition to the fission fragments, particulate radiation energy and gamma rays are usually produced during fission.
fission, nuclear, products,
n.pl the elements (nuclides) or compounds resulting from nuclear fission.
fission products,
n.pl the nuclides produced by the fission of a heavy-element nuclide.

fission

1. the act of splitting.
2. asexual reproduction in which the cell divides into two (binary fission) or more (multiple fission) daughter parts, each of which becomes an individual organism.
3. nuclear fission; the splitting of the atomic nucleus, with release of energy.
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It is also possible that North Korea is using a "boosted" nuclear weapon, which involves a small amount of fusion to amplify the explosive capability of a fission bomb.
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The highspeed neutrons generated by fusion could split apart the u-238 atoms to generate fission, and the fission could generate lots of energy to help maintain the fusion, thus significantly reducing the amount of external energy input, and achieve the complete burning of nuclear fuel to avoid radioactive waste.
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On the other hand, the programme's scope on nuclear fission raises a number of concerns.