fission


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fission

 [fish´un]
1. the act of splitting.
2. asexual reproduction in which the cell divides into two (binary fission) or more (multiple fission) daughter parts, each of which becomes an individual organism.
3. nuclear fission; the splitting of the atomic nucleus, with release of energy.
binary fission the halving of the nucleus and then of the cytoplasm of the cell, as occurs in protozoa.

fis·sion

(fish'ŭn),
1. The act of splitting, for example, amitotic division of a cell or its nucleus.
2. Splitting of the nucleus of an atom.
[L. fissio, a cleaving, fr. findo, pp. fissus, to cleave]

fission

/fis·sion/ (fish´un)
1. the act of splitting.
2. asexual reproduction in which the cell divides into two (binary f.) or more (multiple f.) daughter parts, each of which becomes an individual organism.
3. nuclear fission; the splitting of the atomic nucleus, with release of energy.

fission

(fĭsh′ən, fĭzh′-)
n.
1. The act or process of splitting into parts.
2. Biology An asexual reproductive process in which a unicellular organism divides into two or more independently maturing daughter cells.
v. fis·sioned, fis·sioning, fis·sions

fission

[fish′ən]
Etymology: L, fissio, splitting
1 the act or process of splitting or breaking up into two or more parts.
2 a type of asexual reproduction common in bacteria, protozoa, and other simpler forms of life in which the cell divides into two or more equal components, each of which eventually develops into a complete organism. Kinds of fission are binary fission and multiple fission.
3 (in physics) the splitting of the nucleus of an atom and subsequent release of energy. Also called nuclear fission.

fis·sion

(fish'ŭn)
1. The act of splitting, e.g., amitotic division of a cell or its nucleus.
2. Splitting of the nucleus of an atom.
[L. fissio, a cleaving, fr. findo, pp. fissus, to cleave]

fission

Splitting into parts.
1. The asexual reproductive process by which a single-celled organism or a single cell in a multicellular organism splits into two daughter cells.
2. An atomic event in which the nucleus of an atom splits into fragments, with the loss of a small quantity of matter and the evolution of radiational energy of at least 100 million electron volts (mV).

fission

see BINARY FISSION.

fis·sion

(fish'ŭn)
1. The act of splitting, e.g., a mitotic division of a cell or its nucleus.
2. Splitting of the nucleus of an atom.
[L. fissio, a cleaving, fr. findo, pp. fissus, to cleave]

fission (fish´ən),

n the splitting of a nucleus into two fragments. Fission may occur spontaneously or may be induced artificially. In addition to the fission fragments, particulate radiation energy and gamma rays are usually produced during fission.
fission, nuclear, products,
n.pl the elements (nuclides) or compounds resulting from nuclear fission.
fission products,
n.pl the nuclides produced by the fission of a heavy-element nuclide.

fission

1. the act of splitting.
2. asexual reproduction in which the cell divides into two (binary fission) or more (multiple fission) daughter parts, each of which becomes an individual organism.
3. nuclear fission; the splitting of the atomic nucleus, with release of energy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Binary Fission was designed as a fun and accessible way for "citizen scientists" to help increase the reliability and security of mission critical software by verifying that it is free of cyber vulnerabilities.
To this end, a natural selection experiment will be set up in fission yeast .
When the material is very dilute, the distance between molecules is large and singlet fission does not occur.
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But this begs the question: why would governments invest in fission as opposed to fusion?
Gas samples taken Tuesday from inside the reactor's containment vessel may contain radioactive xenon, a gas typically generated by nuclear fission, the company said.
2 reactor at the plant was caused by spontaneous fission that occurs in any
La presence de ces substances, dont la duree de vie radioactive est tres courte (respectivement 5 jours et 9 heures), semble indiquer que l'uranium a subi "il y a peu de temps" une reaction de fission.
For the most part these are aimed at treating actinide wastes or putting both a fission and fusion reactor in a single facility.
Such spontaneous fission releases stray neutrons; when one of those neutrons hits a uranium atom, it initiates another fission into lighter elements, releasing more neutrons.
Yes, we took the name from comic books, but it is by no means a piece of science fiction," Swadesh Mahajan, an India- born physicist at the University of Texas, who has designed a fusion- fission nuclear reactor, said.
The Brightsen Model derives the average number of prompt neutrons per fission event for many radioactive isotopes of human importance (U-235, U-233, Pu-239, Pu-241) as well as emission of light charged particles, suggesting that all modes of fission derive from a four step process [4].