FISH

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hybridization

 [hi″brid-ĭ-za´shun]
1. the production of hybrids.
fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) a genetic mapping technique using fluorescent tags for analysis of chromosomal aberrations and genetic abnormalities. Called also chromosome painting.
molecular hybridization in molecular biology, formation of a partially or wholly complementary nucleic acid duplex by association of single strands, usually between DNA and RNA strands or previously unassociated DNA strands, but also between RNA strands; used to detect and isolate specific sequences, measure homology, or define other characteristics of one or both strands.

FISH

(fish),

fish

ichthyophobia.

fish

(fĭsh)
n. pl. fish or fishes
1. Any of numerous cold-blooded aquatic vertebrates characteristically having fins, gills, and a streamlined body and including the bony fishes, such as catfishes and tunas, and the cartilaginous fishes, such as sharks and rays.
2. Any of various jawless aquatic craniates, including the lampreys and hagfishes.
3. The flesh of such animals used as food.

FISH

Cardiology Finnish Isradipine Study In Hypertension
Molecular medicine Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization. A method for locating a segment of DNA on a chromosome. The DNA is labeled with a fluorescent dye and hybridized to a cytological preparation of chromosomes that has been denatured to allow nucleic acid hybridization between chromosomal DNA and the probe. The site of hybridization is determined by fluorescent microscopy. FISH is a hybrid of 3 technologies: cytogenetics, fluorescence microscopy, and DNA hybridization, which is used to determine cell ploidy and detect chromosome segments by evaluating interphase—non-dividing—nuclei; in FISH, fluoresceinated chromosome probes are used for cytologic analysis and cytogenetic studies, and to detect intratumoral heterogeneity. In genetics, FISH provides a physical mapping approach to detect hybridization of probes with metaphase chromosomes and with the less-condensed somatic interphase chromatin
DNA probes may be applied to cell preparations on a slide; if the complementary DNA sequence is present, it binds to DNA and can be detected by light microscopy; FISH labels probes nonradioactively either directly with fluorochromes, or indirectly with biotin and fluorochrome-labeled avidin, with digoxeginin and fluorochrome-labeled anti-digoxeginin, or others; the use of multiple band-pass filters allows simultaneous viewing of numerous probes for different chromosomal sequences labeled with different fluorochromes; FISH is useful in cytogenetic studies, where probes for particular chromosomes—e.g., chromosomes 13, 18, 21—or chromosomal regions—e.g., ABL and BCR genes in the Philadelphia translocation—can be used for the prenatal diagnosis of common aneuploidies or to detect early stages of lymphoproliferative disorders; FISH is as sensitive as other analytical techniques—e.g., conventional cytology and flow cytometry, used to diagnose transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder
Pros FISH is simpler, less labor-intensive, and time-consuming—48 hours—than classic cytogenetics—karyotyping—2-3 weeks
Cons Only one question can be asked at a time, i.e., rather than asking ‘global issues’—e.g., what is the genetic composition of a population of cells

FISH

Fluorescent in situ hybridization Molecular medicine A hybrid of 3 technologies: cytogenetics, fluorescence microscopy, and DNA hybridization, which is used to determine cell ploidy and detect chromosome segments by evaluating interphase–non-dividing nuclei; in FISH, fluoresceinated chromosome probes are used for cytologic analysis and cytogenetic studies, and to detect intratumoral heterogeneity. See Chromosomal paint box.

FISH

Abbreviation for fluorescence in situ hybridization.

FISH

Abbrev for fluorescence in situ hybridization. This is a technique for detecting and locating gene mutations and chromosome abnormalities.

fish

any of a large group of cold-blooded, finned aquatic vertebrates. fish are generally scaled, and respire by passing water over gills. fish were formerly placed in a single grouping, class Pisces. It is now recognised that there are four distinct classes, ACTINOPTERYGII, (ray-finned fishes), CHOANICHTHYES (fins with central skeletal axis - collectively sometimes classed as Osteichthyes, see BONY FISH) CHONDRYCHTHYES (sharks) and APHETOHYIDEAN (extinct, primitive, jawed fish).

FISH

acronym for FLUORESCENCE IN SITU HYBRIDIZATION.

FISH

(flourescence in-situ hybridization) Technique used to detect small deletions or rearrangements in chromosomes.
Mentioned in: Prader-Willi Syndrome

fish

members of the classes Cephalochordata (lancelets), Agnatha (hagfish and lampreys), Elasmobranchii (sharks and rays), Holocephali (ghost sharks), Osteichthyes (bony fish), Gastropoda (gastropods), Pelecypoda (bivalves), Cephalopoda (cephalopods), Crustacea (crustaceans).

fish handler's disease
erysipeloid.
fish liver oils
used in animal diets because of their high content of vitamin A and D. Should be stabilized to avoid loss of vitamins in storage and need an antioxidant to avoid rancidification and loss of vitamin E. May also cause tainting of animal foods. See also cod liver oil, omega-3 fatty acids.
fish meal
a protein feed supplement rich in calcium, phosphorus and having a good iodine content. Made from inedible fish residues from the canning and fresh fish industries. May taint animal products. Toxic amines produced by bacterial spoilage cause gizzard erosion and fatal hemorrhage in birds.
fish mouth
used to describe gaping wounds of the skin.
fish mouthing
a surgical technique for anastomosing two pieces of bowel when one is moderately larger in diameter than the other. The smaller diameter is made wider by slitting it longitudinally down the sides so that it opens like a fish's mouth.
fish poisoning
fish scale disease, fish skin disease
see inherited congenital ichthyosis.
fish solubles
dehydrated fishwater from oil extraction and fishmeal industries.
fish tuberculosis
disease of aquarium fish caused by Mycobacterium spp. Causes weight loss, exophthalmos, cutaneous ulcers and pallor. At necropsy there are internal granulomas. The acid-fast organisms can be found in the ulcers. Also found in a variety of cultured species including shrimps.
fish viruses
includes rhabdoviruses and birnavirus.

Patient discussion about FISH

Q. Does fish-oil helps exercise induced asthma? I was diagnosed with exercise induced asthma a couple of year ago, and since then had better and worse times with my asthma, although the treatment I get. I read in a newspaper that fish oil can help exercise induced asthma- is that true? Do I have to eat fish-oil specifically or can I eat fish instead (I really, really, hate fish-oil…)?

A. I take 6, 1000mg softgels/day. It helps my asthma, arthritis and has lowered my closterol. Started with 10 and worked down to 6, which seems to work best, though sometimes I need the extra.

Q. Can omega-3 make my cholesterol lower? My doctor told me that I have too much cholesterol in my blood, and that it can cause heart attack or stroke, but if I keep it low than my risk will be lower. He told me that because it’s not that high level I can try to change my diet before I have to start taking medication. I heard that omega-3 can make my cholesterol level low. Is that true? Do I have to take it in pills? Is it safe?

A. You can consume omega-3 either as pills or in fish oil, fatty fish (such as salmon) and vegetarian food such as flaxseed and flaxseed oil, canola oil, soybean oil, and nuts.

More discussions about FISH
References in periodicals archive ?
Fishable and open stations from CSA 5E and CSA 5W, used in the calculation of the TAC, include the 2009 Sister Lake shell plant, Mid Sister Lake, the N 94 and 95 shell plants, the Sister Lake 2004 cultch plant, and Walker's Point (Table 3, Fig.
TIN biomass estimates were similar to ones produced with the arithmetic mean but were higher for total biomass and lower for fishable biomass.
Desvousges found that people in western Pennsylvania would be willing to pay about $38 a year per household (in 1995 dollars) to make local bodies of water fishable in the five-county region of the study.
The success of any enhancement effort will depend upon the answer to a critical question: What stages in the life history of the organism limit the production of fishable stocks?
AWS seeks to fulfill its mandate of a swimmable and fishable river through its programs of education, action and advocacy.
When it has been fishable, there have been one or two Codling to 4/5lb, with some good Whiting to 11/2lb plus, especially at night.
In order to achieve our vision of a fishable and swimmable Anacostia River by 2025, it is critical to educate community members about their local waterways and teach them what they can do to protect them.
For shore anglers, the Rickenbacker Causeway connects Key Biscayne with the mainland and has fishable catwalks.
Built at the Oconto facility, Rampage Sport Fishing Yachts create highly fishable express and convertible vessels, 34 to 45 feet.
LCI educates, advocates, and motivates to ensure that Lake Champlain is swimmable, drinkable, and fishable, understanding that healthy water resources are essential for a healthy economy and a healthy community.
The wind picked up during the match, though it remained fishable.
Sunday and Monday saw better fishing conditions, but only the south lake was fishable for the 35 visiting anglers.