fish tapeworm infection

fish tapeworm infection

Etymology: AS, fisc, fish
an infection caused by the tapeworm Diphyllobothrium latum that is transmitted to humans when they eat contaminated raw or undercooked freshwater fish. Fish tapeworm infection is common in temperate zones throughout the world and is found in the Great Lakes region of the United States and Alaska. Endemic foci have been found among Eskimos in Alaska and Canada. Most infections are asymptomatic. However, persons may exhibit abdominal discomfort, vomiting, diarrhea, weight loss, and vitamin B12 deficiency. Treatment is praziquantel and vitamin B12, if indicated, for deficiency. In severe cases intestinal obstruction may result. Also called diphyllobothriasis. See also Diphyllobothrium, tapeworm infection.
References in periodicals archive ?
I discuss here information indicating that salmon aquaculture may be involved in expanding the range of fish tapeworm infections in nature and to humans.
The link that closes the epidemiologic chain between the Brazilian outbreak of fish tapeworm infections and the aquaculture of salmon in southern Chile is that some of the freshwater lakes where D.