first-degree relative

first-degree relative

One's mother, father, or biologically related sister(s) or brother(s). People are more likely to share potentially inherited conditions with first-degree relatives than with other more distantly related family members.
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The law requires HRSA to establish the demonstration project for qualified cord blood banks to collect and store at no charge to families, umbilical cord blood units for families where a first-degree relative has been diagnosed with a condition that may benefit from blood stem cell transplantation.
African American men are faced with double the risk of white men, while Asian men have the lowest risk, and men with a first-degree relative with prostate cancer have double the risk of those who don't.
HR6 Mammogram: Women aged 35 and older with a family history of premenopausally diagnosed breast cancer in a first-degree relative.
Thus, they underestimate the threat for women of any age who have one or more risk factors, such as a family history of breast cancer, especially in a first-degree relative such as a mother, sister, or daughter.
An example of a vulnerable person is someone with a first-degree relative with psychosis, "the highest risk factor for schizophrenia," said Dr.
People with a first-degree relative with PD had a more than threefold higher odds for developing PD themselves, compared with those without an affected first-degree relative, based on a meta-analysis of data from 26 case-control studies, and people with any relative with PD had a 4.
In addition, 30 percent of the younger men had aggressive prostate cancer and 41 percent of these men had at least one first-degree relative with prostate cancer.
At present, having a first-degree relative diagnosed with breast cancer before age 40 is considered to be an indication for starting breast cancer surveillance before age 50, Dr.
A family history of premature heart disease was defined as having a first-degree relative with a history of heart attacks before age 50 in men and age 55 in women.
If you determine that a patient's first-degree relative has experienced an aminoglycoside-induced hearing loss, this is a clear suggestion that perhaps the patient should not receive an aminoglycoside.
The existence of germline mutations causing CRC is suggested by the occurrence of CRC in patients less than 50 years of age, and in first-degree relative clusters.
If you know about a first-degree relative with ovarian cancer, it is important to check your family history carefully.