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The views of such philosophers do not accurately reflect the physics of inertia and the First Law of Motion.
In this sense, Newton's First Law of Motion is indifferent to place and is a universal law.
A notion of nature that excludes any kind of explanation in terms of external causes is too extreme for the First Law of Motion.
Newton's first law of motion states that all objects have inertia, or resistance to change in motion As an object's mass increases, so does its inertia An increased yo-yo mass makes it harder to stop the toy once it starts spinning.
According to Newton's first law of motion, when a race car slams into the wall, the driver's body continues flying at a constant velocity until a force--such as the driver's seat belt--acted on it.
Newton's first law of motion states that an object has inertia: It resists change in its motion.
With no outside force acting on the skis, Newton's first law of motion turned from friend to foe: Picabo's body continued to fly in the direction of her velocity--straight into a fence.
B Newton's first law of motion relates to an object's speed end direction.
Bonus: Newton's first law of motion is sometimes referred to as "the law of --.
Here's where the First Law of Motion kicks back in.
The second part of Newton's first law of motion states that objects in motion stay in motion until acted on by an outside force.
Newton's first law of motion again -- moving objects keep moving at a constant speed in one direction unless a force "interferes.