fingerspelling


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fin·ger·spell·ing

(fing'gĕr-spel'ing)
Method of communication using specific finger and hand movements, representing letters of the alphabet, to spell words.
See also: American Manual Alphabet

fin·ger·spell·ing

(fing'gĕr-spel'ing)
Method of communication using specific finger and hand movements.

fingerspelling,

n the manipulation of fingers into different positions, usually based on the manual alphabet, to represent letters of the alphabet.
References in periodicals archive ?
If you want to learn to sign your name, download the fingerspelling alphabet from www.
Some of the available techniques include signs, symbols, signals, fingerspelling, Braille, written notes, speaking, and lipreading; however, if the client does not understand English well, all but the first three techniques would be inappropriate.
ASL Fingerspelling presents the 26 letters of the American Sign Language alphabet, the basic building blocks for learning Sign Language, as a one-time application download.
The other examples of the differences in the above described systems include both productive ESL hand-shapes like N (Figure 2, hand form 28, Figure 5a) or L_ hand forms (Figure 1, hand form 10, Figure 5b) and hand-shapes disappearing from ESL (Figure 1, hand form 7) or used only in ESL fingerspelling alphabet (Figure 2, hand form 14, Figure 5c).
People who use BSL also use fingerspelling to spell out certain names and words on their fingers.
traditional class online Movement 187 190 Location 189 190 Palm 194 188 Handshape 189 191 Conceptual Sign 199 197 Fingerspelling Instead 203 202 of use of correct sign Note: Table made from bar graph.
One fourth of the cases were reported to understand fingerspelling.
It turned out to be almost entirely fingerspelling.
Each story focuses on a simple theme and introduces the child to basic vocabulary and important ASL concepts such as handshaping, fingerspelling, and facial grammar.
Because ASL is not only conveyed by signs, but also has oral, facial, and spatial channels for linguistic output, interpreters can visually represent English by lip movements or by fingerspelling English words.
The main part of her contribution is dedicated to another type of borrowing, that is, the incorporation of fingerspelling into BSL.