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fingerprint

 [fing´ger-print]
1. an impression of the cutaneous ridges of the fleshy distal portion of a finger.
2. in biochemistry, the characteristic pattern of a peptide after subjection to an analytical technique.
DNA fingerprint (genetic fingerprint) the highly specific hybridization pattern generated by tandem repeats and other patterns of the DNA in an individual's genome.

fin·ger·print

(fing'gĕr-print),
1. An impression of the inked bulb of the distal phalanx of a finger, showing the configuration of the surface ridges, used as a means of identification.
See also: dermatoglyphics, Galton system of classification of fingerprints.
2. Term, sometimes used informally, referring to any analytic method applicable to making fine distinctions between similar compounds or gel patterns, for example, the pattern of an infrared absorption curve or of two-dimensional paper chromatograph.
3. In genetics, the analysis of DNA fragments to determine the identity of a person or the paternity of a child. Synonym(s): genetic fingerprint

fingerprint

/fin·ger·print/ (-print)
1. an impression of the cutaneous ridges of the fleshy distal portion of a finger.
2. in biochemistry, the characteristic pattern of a peptide after subjection to an analytical technique.

fingerprint

(fĭng′gər-prĭnt′)
n.
1.
a. A mark left on a surface by a person's fingertip.
b. An inked impression made of a person's fingertip and used for identification.
2. A distinctive or identifying mark or characteristic: "We can, from his retelling [of the incident], with its particular fingerprint of stresses and omissions, learn a great deal about him" (Mark Slouka).
3.
a. A DNA fingerprint.
b. A chemical fingerprint.
tr.v. finger·printed, finger·printing, finger·prints
To take the fingerprints of.

fingerprint

an image left on a smooth surface by the pattern of the pad of a distal phalanx. The distinctive pattern of loops and whorls represents the fine ridges marking the skin. Because each individual's fingerprints are unique, a classification system of the patterns is useful in identifying individuals.
Chemistry The ‘signature(s)’ that a chemical compound and its metabolites have when analysed by a highly sensitive technique—e.g., HPLC or GC-MS—which may be stored on a computer’s hard disk and electronically matched—‘fingerprinted’—with an unknown specimen for the purpose of identification
Dermatology An inked impression of the fleshy part of the distal phalanx of the finger, which may be classified per the Galton arch-loop-whorl system; increased ulnar loops and decreased whorls and arches have been reported in males with Alzheimer’s disease and Down syndrome
Molecular biology AA pattern of bands on an agarose gel produced by a clone when restricted by a particular enzyme, e.g., HindIII

fin·ger·print

(fing'gĕr-print')
1. An impression of the inked bulb of the distal phalanx of a finger, showing the configuration of the surface ridges, used as a means of identification.
See also: dermatoglyphics, Galton system of classification of fingerprints
2. Term, sometimes used informally, referring to any analytic method capable of making fine distinctions between similar compounds or gel patterns (e.g., the pattern of an infrared absorption curve or of a two-dimensional paper chromatograph).
3. genetics Analysis of DNA fragments to determine the identity of a person or the paternity of a child.
Enlarge picture
FINGERPRINT

fingerprint

1. A smudge made when oils from the distal portions of the finger come into contact with an object. Fingerprints are used in forensics for personal identification.
2. A unique sequence of nucleotides in a gene, used to identify specific organisms or individuals.
See: illustration

fingerprint

1. The unique pattern printed by the ridges of epidermis on the pulpy surfaces of the ends of the fingers and thumbs.
2. Of a protein, the pattern of fragments exposed by electrophoresis after splitting with a proteolytic enzyme such as trypsin.
3. Of DNA, a patterns of varying-length (polymorphic) restriction fragments that differs from one individual to another and that can be used as a means of unique identification.
4. Of a protein, the pattern of fragments produced on a plane surface when a protein is digested by a protein-splitting enzyme. See also DNA FINGERPRINTING.

dermatoglyphics

finger and toe prints; pattern of lines and whorls in pulp skin unique to the individual

fin·ger·print

(fing'gĕr-print')
1. An impression of the inked bulb of the distal phalanx of a finger, showing the configuration of the surface ridges, used as a means of identification.
2. Term for any analytic method capable of making fine distinctions between similar compounds or gel patterns.

fingerprint

References in periodicals archive ?
Everyone's fingerprints are different, and we leave marks on everything we touch.
This trial does not require dusting the fingerprint, so it is your "control.
tuberculosis Strains on the Basis of DNA Fingerprint Patterns by Using the IS6110 Method in Specific Geographic Areas.
Currently, fingerprints remain the best, and often only accepted, way to establish records that law enforcement can use to match conclusively with an unknown or questioned subject.
Fingerprinting representative Mitch Gremillion checks a fingerprint taken from Shondrea Davis, a new employee at the Hawaiian Gardens Casino.
The AES1610 fingerprint sensor allows authorized users to simply slide their finger across the integrated sensor to log on, access personal online banking and financial transactions, email and other password-protected Web sites, and to quickly switch applications - eliminating the need to remember cumbersome passwords and PINs.
When DNA fingerprints for isolates analyzed from 1992 to 2000 were reviewed for clustering, we identified a cluster of 15 TB patients.
The most common systems identify or authenticate users by their fingerprints, eyes, hands, faces, or voices.
We even fingerprint the guy who delivers our water,'' said Melissa Meith, chief counsel at the California Lottery.
Thus, the DNA fingerprint from an innocent suspect could match that of the real criminal.
It's thrown the legal system for a loop because it is much mre powerful than any ID technique they've had other than normal fingerprints.
New CY4665 Design Delivers Industry's Strongest Security and True Portability for UFDs With Cypress's USB Technology and UPEK's Fingerprint Authentication Solution