fingerprint


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fingerprint

 [fing´ger-print]
1. an impression of the cutaneous ridges of the fleshy distal portion of a finger.
2. in biochemistry, the characteristic pattern of a peptide after subjection to an analytical technique.
DNA fingerprint (genetic fingerprint) the highly specific hybridization pattern generated by tandem repeats and other patterns of the DNA in an individual's genome.

fin·ger·print

(fing'gĕr-print),
1. An impression of the inked bulb of the distal phalanx of a finger, showing the configuration of the surface ridges, used as a means of identification.
See also: dermatoglyphics, Galton system of classification of fingerprints.
2. Term, sometimes used informally, referring to any analytic method applicable to making fine distinctions between similar compounds or gel patterns, for example, the pattern of an infrared absorption curve or of two-dimensional paper chromatograph.
3. In genetics, the analysis of DNA fragments to determine the identity of a person or the paternity of a child. Synonym(s): genetic fingerprint

fingerprint

/fin·ger·print/ (-print)
1. an impression of the cutaneous ridges of the fleshy distal portion of a finger.
2. in biochemistry, the characteristic pattern of a peptide after subjection to an analytical technique.

fingerprint

(fĭng′gər-prĭnt′)
n.
1.
a. A mark left on a surface by a person's fingertip.
b. An inked impression made of a person's fingertip and used for identification.
2. A distinctive or identifying mark or characteristic: "We can, from his retelling [of the incident], with its particular fingerprint of stresses and omissions, learn a great deal about him" (Mark Slouka).
3.
a. A DNA fingerprint.
b. A chemical fingerprint.
tr.v. finger·printed, finger·printing, finger·prints
To take the fingerprints of.

fingerprint

an image left on a smooth surface by the pattern of the pad of a distal phalanx. The distinctive pattern of loops and whorls represents the fine ridges marking the skin. Because each individual's fingerprints are unique, a classification system of the patterns is useful in identifying individuals.
Chemistry The ‘signature(s)’ that a chemical compound and its metabolites have when analysed by a highly sensitive technique—e.g., HPLC or GC-MS—which may be stored on a computer’s hard disk and electronically matched—‘fingerprinted’—with an unknown specimen for the purpose of identification
Dermatology An inked impression of the fleshy part of the distal phalanx of the finger, which may be classified per the Galton arch-loop-whorl system; increased ulnar loops and decreased whorls and arches have been reported in males with Alzheimer’s disease and Down syndrome
Molecular biology AA pattern of bands on an agarose gel produced by a clone when restricted by a particular enzyme, e.g., HindIII

fin·ger·print

(fing'gĕr-print')
1. An impression of the inked bulb of the distal phalanx of a finger, showing the configuration of the surface ridges, used as a means of identification.
See also: dermatoglyphics, Galton system of classification of fingerprints
2. Term, sometimes used informally, referring to any analytic method capable of making fine distinctions between similar compounds or gel patterns (e.g., the pattern of an infrared absorption curve or of a two-dimensional paper chromatograph).
3. genetics Analysis of DNA fragments to determine the identity of a person or the paternity of a child.
Enlarge picture
FINGERPRINT

fingerprint

1. A smudge made when oils from the distal portions of the finger come into contact with an object. Fingerprints are used in forensics for personal identification.
2. A unique sequence of nucleotides in a gene, used to identify specific organisms or individuals.
See: illustration

fingerprint

1. The unique pattern printed by the ridges of epidermis on the pulpy surfaces of the ends of the fingers and thumbs.
2. Of a protein, the pattern of fragments exposed by electrophoresis after splitting with a proteolytic enzyme such as trypsin.
3. Of DNA, a patterns of varying-length (polymorphic) restriction fragments that differs from one individual to another and that can be used as a means of unique identification.
4. Of a protein, the pattern of fragments produced on a plane surface when a protein is digested by a protein-splitting enzyme. See also DNA FINGERPRINTING.

dermatoglyphics

finger and toe prints; pattern of lines and whorls in pulp skin unique to the individual

fin·ger·print

(fing'gĕr-print')
1. An impression of the inked bulb of the distal phalanx of a finger, showing the configuration of the surface ridges, used as a means of identification.
2. Term for any analytic method capable of making fine distinctions between similar compounds or gel patterns.

fingerprint

References in periodicals archive ?
Fingerprints and footprints can be taken at negligible expense, while DNA genotyping and analysis can cost several thousand dollars.
These prints and related data will be processed by a local automated fingerprint identification system and then transmitted to and processed by a State identification bureau.
UPEK has worked diligently to optimize the TouchChip TCS1 fingerprint capture system to meet the demanding requirements established by NIST and the FBI for Single Fingerprint Capture Devices," said Mike Chaudoin, Director of Standards and Security at UPEK.
Now that UPEK has a FIPS 201 certified silicon fingerprint sensor, it allows NEC to extend our support of that sensor into the Civil AFIS market, where NEC's ANSI 378-compliant algorithm has already been certified by NIST.
We're proud that ASUS has chosen our TouchStrip fingerprint authentication solution to protect its notebooks," stated Greg Goelz, VP of marketing, UPEK, Inc.
With BlueCheck, Cogent's latest Mobile Identification handheld device, law enforcement personnel will be able to remotely submit fingerprint searches for real-time identification.
amp; MUNICH, Germany -- Targa has selected fingerprint sensors from AuthenTec to add advanced security, convenience and other touch-controlled features to its new Targa Traveller 836W MT34 Notebook PC, which is designed specifically for the consumer market.
Ultra-Scan Corporation, an identity management solutions provider, today announced that it will integrate its TouchPoint(TM) biometric-enabled single sign-on (SSO) solution with the TouchChip(R) TCS1 Fingerprint Sensor from UPEK, a leading global brand of biometric fingerprint security solutions.
UPEK's TCS1 Silicon Fingerprint Sensors Combine With Cogent's Fingerprint Algorithms for Leading Edge Biometric System Performance
However, according to a recent study by criminologist Simon Cole of the University of California, Irvine, authorities may make as many as 1,000 incorrect fingerprint matches each year in the United States.
Sprinkle the fingerprint with 5 ml (1 tsp) of baby powder, or enough to cover the fingerprint.