fingerprint


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fingerprint

 [fing´ger-print]
1. an impression of the cutaneous ridges of the fleshy distal portion of a finger.
2. in biochemistry, the characteristic pattern of a peptide after subjection to an analytical technique.
DNA fingerprint (genetic fingerprint) the highly specific hybridization pattern generated by tandem repeats and other patterns of the DNA in an individual's genome.

fin·ger·print

(fing'gĕr-print),
1. An impression of the inked bulb of the distal phalanx of a finger, showing the configuration of the surface ridges, used as a means of identification.
See also: dermatoglyphics, Galton system of classification of fingerprints.
2. Term, sometimes used informally, referring to any analytic method applicable to making fine distinctions between similar compounds or gel patterns, for example, the pattern of an infrared absorption curve or of two-dimensional paper chromatograph.
3. In genetics, the analysis of DNA fragments to determine the identity of a person or the paternity of a child. Synonym(s): genetic fingerprint

fingerprint

/fin·ger·print/ (-print)
1. an impression of the cutaneous ridges of the fleshy distal portion of a finger.
2. in biochemistry, the characteristic pattern of a peptide after subjection to an analytical technique.

fingerprint

(fĭng′gər-prĭnt′)
n.
1.
a. A mark left on a surface by a person's fingertip.
b. An inked impression made of a person's fingertip and used for identification.
2. A distinctive or identifying mark or characteristic: "We can, from his retelling [of the incident], with its particular fingerprint of stresses and omissions, learn a great deal about him" (Mark Slouka).
3.
a. A DNA fingerprint.
b. A chemical fingerprint.
tr.v. finger·printed, finger·printing, finger·prints
To take the fingerprints of.

fingerprint

an image left on a smooth surface by the pattern of the pad of a distal phalanx. The distinctive pattern of loops and whorls represents the fine ridges marking the skin. Because each individual's fingerprints are unique, a classification system of the patterns is useful in identifying individuals.
Chemistry The ‘signature(s)’ that a chemical compound and its metabolites have when analysed by a highly sensitive technique—e.g., HPLC or GC-MS—which may be stored on a computer’s hard disk and electronically matched—‘fingerprinted’—with an unknown specimen for the purpose of identification
Dermatology An inked impression of the fleshy part of the distal phalanx of the finger, which may be classified per the Galton arch-loop-whorl system; increased ulnar loops and decreased whorls and arches have been reported in males with Alzheimer’s disease and Down syndrome
Molecular biology AA pattern of bands on an agarose gel produced by a clone when restricted by a particular enzyme, e.g., HindIII

fin·ger·print

(fing'gĕr-print')
1. An impression of the inked bulb of the distal phalanx of a finger, showing the configuration of the surface ridges, used as a means of identification.
See also: dermatoglyphics, Galton system of classification of fingerprints
2. Term, sometimes used informally, referring to any analytic method capable of making fine distinctions between similar compounds or gel patterns (e.g., the pattern of an infrared absorption curve or of a two-dimensional paper chromatograph).
3. genetics Analysis of DNA fragments to determine the identity of a person or the paternity of a child.
Enlarge picture
FINGERPRINT

fingerprint

1. A smudge made when oils from the distal portions of the finger come into contact with an object. Fingerprints are used in forensics for personal identification.
2. A unique sequence of nucleotides in a gene, used to identify specific organisms or individuals.
See: illustration

fingerprint

1. The unique pattern printed by the ridges of epidermis on the pulpy surfaces of the ends of the fingers and thumbs.
2. Of a protein, the pattern of fragments exposed by electrophoresis after splitting with a proteolytic enzyme such as trypsin.
3. Of DNA, a patterns of varying-length (polymorphic) restriction fragments that differs from one individual to another and that can be used as a means of unique identification.
4. Of a protein, the pattern of fragments produced on a plane surface when a protein is digested by a protein-splitting enzyme. See also DNA FINGERPRINTING.

dermatoglyphics

finger and toe prints; pattern of lines and whorls in pulp skin unique to the individual

fin·ger·print

(fing'gĕr-print')
1. An impression of the inked bulb of the distal phalanx of a finger, showing the configuration of the surface ridges, used as a means of identification.
2. Term for any analytic method capable of making fine distinctions between similar compounds or gel patterns.

fingerprint

References in periodicals archive ?
The office proposed a series of safeguards for fingerprint identification records of the Ontario government's social assistance programs.
The lack of reproducibility of the RFLP DNA fingerprinting technique and the difficulty in comparing patterns in an RFLP DNA fingerprint database remain important limitations in developing strategies for universal implementation.
Clinton's fingerprints could have been left in 1992, the year she said she handled the documents.
In cases where the central State repositories do not have fingerprint cards for the arrest or conviction, investigators should check with the original arresting agency, which might have a duplicate set.
Jeffreys and his colleagues conclude, This difficult case demonstrates how DNA fingerprints can give unequivocal positive evidence of relationship, even in some cases where critical family members are missing.
The 3M System converts document holders' fingerprints into a biometric template then encodes the prints into an internationally standardized, two-dimensional bar code printed on the SID card.
Even the footprints and fingerprints of identical twins are different.
To make such searches possible, the FBI has developed the Integrated Automated Fingerprint Identification System.
Have each student make a fingerprint using the method that worked best.
tuberculosis Strains on the Basis of DNA Fingerprint Patterns by Using the IS6110 Method in Specific Geographic Areas.
Researchers at SEARCH, the National Consortium for Justice Information and Statistics, surveyed state criminal history record systems and found that 28 states have laws that require local jails not only to fingerprint all admitted prisoners but to send the fingerprint to the state repository.