finding of impairment

finding of impairment

A formal decision by a Fitness to Practise Panel—appointed by the UK’s General Medical Council (GMC) to hear a case regarding a doctor's ability (fitness) to practise without restrictio—that the alleged facts have been proved, and that the doctor's fitness to practise is impaired.
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The tribunal has also determined that a finding of impairment is both necessary and appropriate in the public interest.
The public interest demands that a finding of impairment is necessary to mark this conduct as wholly unacceptable and to ensure that public confidence in the nursing profession and the NMC as its regulator is maintained.
While confirming that the committee was satisfied that Ms McCue is of previous "good character," and the incident was isolated in a career spanning over 23 years, Mr Kellock added that: "Nevertheless, the committee considered these matters are so serious that the public interest required a finding of impairment to be made in this case.
The NMC panel also considered that public confidence in the profession would be undermined if a finding of impairment were not made in the particular circumstances of this case.
The results of the testing will be used by accountants to conduct a further detailed investigation and through financial audit, so as to determine any need for finding of impairment and in what amount.
The panel has no doubt that any well-balanced and reasonably well-informed member of the public would justifiably conclude that a finding of impairment of your fitness to practise was required in order to uphold proper professional standards.
Although the panel was of the view that you were regretful, remorseful and had a degree of insight into the seriousness of this, the wider public interest can only be served by a finding of impairment.
The panel has determined that, although the PCC considered your actions serious in 2004, the panel today, in the light of the evidence given to it by eminent paediatricians and your expressions of regret and remorse, considers that a finding of impairment is not justified.
Public interest can only be saved by a finding of impairment.
theliver Panel chair John Weedon said: "[The panel] was satisfied that a member of the public in full knowledge of the circumstances of the case, and being aware of the insight and remediation demonstrated, would not consider a finding of impairment necessary to uphold the reputation of the profession and maintain proper standards.
In light of the nature and seriousness of Mrs Rudkin's misconduct, the panel concluded that the need to uphold proper professional standards and public confidence in the profession would be undermined if a finding of impairment of fitness to practise were not made in the circumstances of this case," the NMC report said.
It concluded that public confidence in the dental profession and the need to uphold proper standards of conduct and behaviour would be undermined if a finding of impairment were not made in this case.