fimbria

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fimbria

 [fim´bre-ah] (pl. fim´briae) (L.)
1. a fringe, border, or edge; a fringelike structure.
2. pilus (def. 2).
fimbriae of fallopian tube the numerous divergent fringelike processes on the distal part of the infundibulum of the fallopian tube; called also fimbriae of uterine tube.
fimbria hippocam´pi the band of white matter along the median edge of the ventricular surface of the hippocampus.
fimbriae of uterine tube fimbriae of fallopian tube.

fim·bri·a

, pl.

fim·bri·ae

(fim'brē-ă, -brē-ē),
1. Any fringelike structure. Synonym(s): fringe
2. Synonym(s): pilus (2)
[L. fringe]

fimbria

/fim·bria/ (fim´bre-ah) pl. fim´briae   [L.]
1. a fringe, border, or edge; a fringelike structure.
2. pilus (2).

fimbria hippocam´pi  the band of white matter along the median edge of the ventricular surface of the hippocampus.
ovarian fimbria  the longest of the processes that make up the fimbriae of uterine tube, extending along the free border of the mesosalpinx and fused to the ovary.
fimbriae of uterine tube  the numerous divergent fringelike processes on the distal part of the infundibulum of the uterine tube.

fimbria

(fĭm′brē-ə)
n. pl. fim·briae (-brē-ē′)
1. A fringelike part or structure, as at the opening of the fallopian tubes.
2. A bacterial pilus.

fim′bri·al adj.

fimbria

[fim′brē·ə]
Etymology: L, fringe
any structure that forms a border or edge or that resembles a fringe. Kinds of fimbria are fimbria hippocampi, fimbria ovarica, and fimbriae tubae terminale (spinal cord). See also pilus, def. 2.

fim·bri·a

, pl. fimbriae (fim'brē-ă, -ē)
1. Any fringelike structure.
2. Synonym(s): pilus (2) .
[L. fringe]

fimbria

(pl. fimbriae) or pilus (pl. pili) a short hair-like structure on the surface of BACTERIA, used for attachment.

fimbria

calcium-dependent, actin-binding proteins that modulate behaviour of intracellular monofilaments

fimbria

pl. fimbriae [L.]
1. a fringe, border or edge; a fringelike structure.
2. one of the minute filamentous appendages of certain bacteria; associated with antigenic properties of the cell surface. See also pilus, adhesin.

fimbria hippocampi
the band of white matter along the median edge of the ventricular surface of the hippocampus.
ovarian fimbria
occur together with the fimbriae of the uterine horn. Located in the ovulation fossa.
uterine tube fimbria
the numerous divergent fringelike processes on the distal part of the infundibulum of the uterine tube.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mucosal immunization of piglets with purified F18 fimbriae does not protect against [F18.
Fimbriae and enterotoxins associated with Escherichia coli serogroups isolated from pigs with colibacillosis.
coli to uro-epithelia by suppressing the synthesis of fimbriae and flagellae in a fashion reminiscent of the cranberry effects on bacteria (Sun et al.
viscosus fimbriae has been difficult to study because neither type of fimbriae can be completely dissociated into subunits and analyzed," says Mergenhagen.
SEM was used to observe fimbriae production, as previously described (Lee et al.
For the successful pick-up and, transfer of the ovum, its subsequent fertilisation and continued transfer down the tube to the uterine cavity we need an undamaged tube preferably with intact fimbriae, an open tube, a tube that can move freely (mobile) and an intact lining membrane especially with undamaged specialised cells and their hair--like processes which waft the egg on its way.
Chicken egg yolk antibodies against F18ab fimbriae of Escherichia coli inhibit shedding of F18 positive E.
Hatching was triggered by the bacteria's fimbriae, which bind to proteins at the poles of the worm's eggs.
Other important virulence factors in ETEC include production of one or more colonization factors (CFs), which usually are fimbriae (10,11).
Blood samples were measured for pertussis antigens, including pertussis toxoid, filamentous hemagglutinin, pertactin, and fimbriae, by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.
Early tubal carcinoma is typically of serous type and arises most commonly in the fimbriae but other histologic variants have been described and other fallopian tube segments may be affected.
The bacteria use their fimbriae to attach themselves to the bladder so that they can multiply and cause an infection.