film badge

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Related to film badges: Thermoluminescent Dosimeter

film badge

 [film baj]
a pack of radiographic film or films worn as a badge, used for the detection and approximate measurement of radiation exposure of personnel.

film badge

(baj) a pack of radiographic film or films, usually worn on the body during potential exposure to radiation in order to detect and quantitate the dosage of exposure.

film badge

Radiation safety A dosimeter worn by radiation workers to monitor radiation exposure; FBs contain a piece of film that is darkened by radiation, and may contain filters which shield parts of the film from certain types of radiation. See Dosimetry.

film badge

(film baj)
Small packet of x-ray film and filters worn by radiation workers to monitor exposure to radiation on a monthly basis.
See also: pocket dosimeter, thermoluminescent dosimeter

film badge

A small light-tight container for a piece of photographic film which is carried, pinned to the clothing, by all staff in X-ray and radiotherapy departments. The films are regularly developed and a fogged film indicates that accidental exposure to radiation has occurred. The matter is then investigated.

film badge

(film baj)
Device consisting of a strip of photographic film in a lightproof envelope, worn by dentists and ancillary personnel to monitor occupational exposure to x-rays.
Synonym(s): radiation dosimeter.

film

1. a thin layer or coating.
2. a thin sheet of material (e.g. gelatin, cellulose acetate) specially treated for use in photography or radiography; used also to designate the sheet after exposure to the energy to which it is sensitive.

film badge
a radiographic film worn as a badge and used for detection and approximate measurement of radiographic exposure of personnel.
film changing device
enables the radiographer to change films quickly when a series of shots is being used, e.g. angiography.
copy film
film with a special reversal emulsion so that a contact print can be made with white light. Called also duplicating film.
dental film
nonscreen film used in dental radiography.
duplicating film
see copy film (above).
flat film
a film lacking in radiographic contrast.
gelatin film
a sterile, nonantigenic, absorbable, water-insoluble coating used as an aid in surgical closure and repair of defects in the dura mater and pleura and as a local hemostatic.
film label
details of the animal examined and when and where the examination took place. Usually made on the x-ray by photographic means or by using radiopaque tape.
film marker
any device, usually lead letters, placed on the film to indicate which part of the animal was examined and the projection used.
nonscreen film
film for getting very fine detail, used without a cassette and requiring long exposure time. This film is now banned in some parts of the world.
plain film
an x-ray film taken without contrast medium or other special effects. Often an exploratory or scout film.
spot film
a radiograph of a small anatomic area obtained (1) by rapid exposure during fluoroscopy to provide a permanent record of a transiently observed abnormality, or (2) by limitation of radiation passing through the area to improve definition and detail of the image produced.
standard film
fine-grain, medium-speed with wide tolerance for exposure times.
x-ray film
film sensitized to x-rays, either before or after exposure.
References in periodicals archive ?
When the soldiers' film badges recorded unsafe levels of radioactivity, the men were told to take multiple showers and change their clothes.
Film badges generally offer the benefits of faster throughput-about 50 badges per hour versus a maximum of 30 badges per hour for thermal-as well as better portrait stability and quality.
Last year, the Defense Nuclear Agency (DNA) computed the participants' test-related radiation exposures, based on dosimeter readings from the 6,300 who had worn film badges, and found no evidence that overexposures had occurred.
The company is remedying this situation by offering its dosimetry solutions to a third party that sells the technology to the film badges market in medical applications.
Crucially the photograph shows the men, Ronald Coates, John Carr, Peter Cutforth and Harry Rowlands wearing dosimeters, film badges used to measure radiation exposure.