filling defect


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defect

 [de´fekt]
an imperfection, failure, or absence.
congenital heart defect see congenital heart defect.
aortic septal defect see aortic septal defect.
atrial septal defect see atrial septal defect.
filling defect an interruption in the contour of the inner surface of stomach or intestine revealed by radiography, indicating excess tissue or substance on or in the wall of the organ.
neural tube defect see neural tube defect.
septal defect a defect in the cardiac septum resulting in an abnormal communication between opposite chambers of the heart. Common types are aortic septal defect, atrial septal defect, and ventricular septal defect. See also congenital heart defect.

fill·ing de·fect

displacement of contrast medium by a space-occupying lesion in a radiographic study of a contrast-filled hollow viscus, such as a polyp on a barium enema; also applied to defects in the otherwise uniform distribution of radionuclide in an organ, such as a metastasis in the liver on a 99mTc-sulfur colloid scan.

filling defect

An imaging term of art referring to a reduction in filling of a focal, typically rounded hollow viscus (e.g., urinary bladder, gallbladder, colon) by radiocontrast due the presence of a mass that projects into the lumen.

filling defect

Imaging A displacement of radiocontrast by a bulky lesion–eg a polyp of the stomach or colon, which often corresponds to a space-occupying mass in a hollow organ. See Defect.

fill·ing de·fect

(fil'ing dē'fekt)
Displacement of contrast medium by a space-occupying lesion in a radiographic study of a contrast-filled hollow viscus, such as a polyp on a barium enema; also applied to defects in the otherwise uniform distribution of radionuclide in an organ, such as a metastasis in the liver on a 99mTc-sulfur colloid scan.

defect

an imperfection, failure or absence.

filling defect
an interruption in the contour of the inner surface of viscus revealed by contrast radiography, indicating excess tissue or substance on or in the wall of the organ, foreign body or other space-occupying lesions.
negative defect
in neurology, a movement that cannot be performed, such as in paresis or paralysis.
positive defect
in neurology, an involuntary movement, such as tremors, abnormal posture or seizures.
septal defect
a defect in the cardiac septum resulting in an abnormal communication between opposite chambers of the heart. See also aortic septal defect, atrial septal defect and ventricular septal defect.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, when a ductogram confirms this finding, no abnormal filling defect is noted, and the discharge is not suspicious (i.
Despite multiple attempts at angioplasty, large filling defects were still noted at the first rib/subclavian vein junction (Figure 2C), and, although initial improvement in flow was noted, there was complete reocclusion of this region with stasis of contrast after about 5 minutes.
The upper gastrointestinal (GI) barium series revealed a large, mottled, filling defect in the stomach (Figure 1).
A study presented at the RSNA meeting in 2003 using prototype software on a set of pulmonary embolism cases showed the filling defect indicator was able to detect 88 percent of the segmental and 78 percent of the subsegmental emboli.
With the infusion of intravenous contrast, a hypodense filling defect is seen within an enlarged vein, and there may be a variable amount of venous wall enhancement.
This software targets the detection and follow-up of lung nodules and the detection of pulmonary arterial filling defects.
These include complete occlusion or stenosis, a web or flap within the artery, an intraluminal filling defect with occasional calcification that forms obtuse angles with the vessel wall, and thickening or calcification of the vessel wall (Figure 15).
An important factor in the evaluation of colon filling defects is size, as the potential risk of malignancy increases with size.
Papillomas may not be visible using ultrasound; however, when they are seen, they can have a variety of appearances, including a small, solid mass; a dilated duct containing a filling defect; or a cystic lesion with an associated irregular mass or filling defect.
6) Commonly solitary and in the proximal ureter, the tumor is usually identified as a smooth long filling defect that may be seen to move between the different acquisitions if it is attached by a long stalk.