filariform

filariform

 [fĭ-lār´ĭ-form]
resembling filariae; threadlike.

fi·lar·i·form

(fi-lar'i-fōrm),
1. Resembling filariae or other types of small nematode worms.
See also: filariform larva.
2. Thin or hairlike.

filariform

[filer′ifôrm]
pertaining to a structure or organism that is threadlike.

fi·lar·i·form

(fi-lar'i-fōrm)
1. Resembling filariae or other types of small nematode worms.
2. Thin or hairlike.

Filariform

Threadlike in appearance, like the infectious stage of the threadworm larva.
Mentioned in: Threadworm Infection

filariform

resembling filariae; threadlike.
References in periodicals archive ?
Stool examination performed by direct wet mount technique showed filariform larvae of Strongyloides stercoralis (Figure 1).
These larvae exhibited smooth tegument, rounded head with a short buccal cavity, and a filariform esophagus occupying approximately one third of the body length.
Strongyloidiasis is a difficult to treat because of its auto infective filariform larva more so in cases with paralytic ileus due to poor absorption of the drug.
Filariform larvae of Strongyloides stercoralis penetrate the skin, undergo heart and lung migration, migrate into alveoli and subsequently ascend to trachea.
Punicagranatum commonly known as (Anar) the roots and bark of the stem of this plant has been used as astringent (antidiarrheal) and anthelmentic plant and experimentally proved that the alcoholic extract of the stem bark of this plant inhibit the hatching of Haemonchuscontortuseggs to filariform larvae, the aqueous, alcoholic and ether extract from seeds of the plant Cucerbita maxima has proved its vermifugal activity experimentaly against Platyhelminthes (trematode and cestodes) and nemathelminthes (nematodes) both In Vitro as well as In Vivo trials.
Rhabditiform and filariform larvae were isolated by stool culture (Figure, panel B).
4) Infection is initiated by filariform larvae present in soil or feces that use a histiolytic protease to penetrate skin and access the venous or lymphatic vessels of the human host.
A filariform larva is transmitted from the soil and penetrates into the skin.
The infective forms of Strongyloides are filariform rather than rhabditiform larva and do not have an esophagus that contains a corpus, isthmus, and bulb.
The filariform stage penetrates the anal skin or intestinal mucosa, perpetuating infection, which may persist for 40 years--long after the patient has immigrated.
Most cases of human infection are acquired from penetration of the skin by the filariform larvae stage from soil.