filament

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Related to filamentary: filamentary keratitis

filament

 [fil´ah-ment]
1. a delicate fiber or thread.
2. in an x-ray tube, the wire (cathode) that makes electrons available for interaction with the anode when it is heated to incandescence to form an electron cloud.
actin filament one of the thin contractile filaments in a myofibril, composed mainly of actin; each actin filament is surrounded by three myosin filaments.
myosin filament one of the thick contractile filaments in a myofibril, composed mainly of myosin; each myosin filament is surrounded by six actin filaments.

fil·a·ment

(fil'ă-ment),
1. Synonym(s): filamentum
2. In bacteriology, a fine threadlike form, unsegmented or segmented without constrictions.
[L. filamentum, fr. filum, a thread]

filament

/fil·a·ment/ (fil´ah-ment) a delicate fiber or thread.
actin filament  one of the thin contractile myofilaments in a myofibril.
intermediate filaments  a class of cytoplasmic filaments that predominantly act as structural components of the cytoskeleton and also effect various movements in cellular processes.
muscle filament  myofilament.
myosin filament  one of the thick contractile myofilaments in a myofibril.
thick filaments  bipolar myosin filaments occurring in striated muscle.
thin filaments  actin filaments occurring, associated with troponin and tropomyosin, in striated muscle.

filament

(fĭl′ə-mənt)
n.
1. A fine or very thin thread or fiber: filaments of cloth; filaments of flax.
2. A slender or threadlike structure or part, especially:
a. A fine wire that is heated electrically to produce light in an incandescent lamp.
b. The stalk that bears the anther in the stamen of a flower.
c. A chainlike series of cells, as in many algae.
d. A long thin cellular structure characteristic of many fungi, usually having multiple nuclei and often divided by septa.
e. Any of various long thin celestial objects or phenomena, such as a solar filament.

fil′a·men′tous (-mĕn′təs), fil′a·men′ta·ry (-mĕn′tə-rē, -mĕn′trē) adj.

filament

[fil′əmənt]
Etymology: L, filare, to spin
a fine threadlike fiber. Filaments are found in most tissues and cells of the body and serve various morphological or physiological functions.

fil·a·ment

(fil'ă-mĕnt)
1. Synonym(s): filamentum.
2. bacteriology A fine threadlike form, unsegmented or segmented without constrictions.
3. A tungsten wire located within the cathode of a diagnostic x-ray tube. After being heated it produces electrons.
[L. filamentum, fr. filum, a thread]

filament

  1. the stalk of a STAMEN bearing the ANTHER at its apex.
  2. a type of cellular organization consisting of a threadlike row of cells, as found in certain algae, for example, Spirogyra.

fil·a·ment

(fil'ă-mĕnt)
1. Synonym(s): filamentum.
2. bacteriology a fine threadlike form, unsegmented or segmented without constrictions.
[L. filamentum, fr. filum, a thread]

filament,

n an individual manufactured toothbrush bristle.
filament, curved,
n a single toothbrush bristle, manufactured to bend with the curve of the dental surface, designed to assist contact with the gingival line when used at a 45° angle.
filament, end rounded,
n refers to the manufactured shaping of an individual toothbrush bristle with an exceptionally rounded tip designed to protect teeth and gums during brushing.

filament

a delicate fiber or thread.

beard filament
structures of the beard of the male turkey are neither hairs nor feathers but have some of the characteristics of both.
filament control
in an x-ray machine this controls the filament current in the x-ray tube. The size of the current and its duration are controlled in this way.
filament current
in an x-ray machine the strength of the current to the filament is varied by the use of a filament or stepdown transformer.
filament focal spot size
the focal spot of the x-ray beam should be as small as possible to give maximum sharpness and clarity. Its size is determined by the size of the filament opposite that generates the beam, the anode angle and other factors.
intermediate filament
non-contractile elements in the supportive structure of cytoplasm.
References in periodicals archive ?
On confocal examination, hyphae of filamentary fungi and pseudohyphae of Candida are often visualised, especially at the edges of a dense lesion where there is more contrast and the structures are easier to define (see Figure 3).
Branching filamentary structures sometimes form in the streamers, as documented through high-speed photographic experiments conducted by Hebner, Kelley, and Stricklett at NBS in the 1980s [58].
The cosmic web is the global, filamentary structure of the Universe with clusters of galaxies sitting at the intersects of this network.
Typically in two-terminal configurations of Al/PEDOT:PSS (~70 nm)/Al [71] and Al/PEDOT:PSS/Cu device [72], the bipolar switching was proposed to arise from metal filamentary switching.
He also drew attention to the filamentary structures present in both streams, and alluded to in the paper by Cooper.
There were also cases where a scleral was dispensed to alleviate continuous ocular discomfort caused by filamentary keratitis, and to improve the appearance of a long-standing ptosis.
We have found that the filamentary structures that galaxies are built on are key to how they build up over time, by threading gas into them efficiently," said Leonidas Moustakas, a co-author at JPL.
The nebula has a knotty and filamentary structure surrounding bluish lobes.
In comparing Mariner and Viking imagery for albedo changes, Geissler (35) has described the Nilosyrtis area as being literally crisscrossed by filamentary linear streaks diagnostic of dust devil tracks.
Here we report the discovery that the dynamical 3-space theory possesses such filamentary solutions, and so does away with the "dark matter" interpretation.
This composite portrait is providing a closer look at the clumpy, filamentary nature of the remnant, a more precise measurement of its distance from Earth, and a clearer indication of the type of star that exploded to become Kepler's supernova.