figure-ground relationship

figure-ground relationship

[fig′(y)ər]
Etymology: L, figura, form; AS, grund + L, relatus, carry back
a perceptual field that is divided into a figure, which is the object of focus, and a diffuse background. See also ground.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, the new format is less tectonic; the former dense, fully colored surfaces now yield to an airy, freer figure-ground relationship.
Even my oldest groups have had problems establishing a figure-ground relationship in relief work.
Wilkins and colleagues have proposed an implicational hierarchy for what types of Figure-Ground relationship enter into this BLC (Kita and Walsh Dickey 1998: 55-69; Ameka and Levinson this issue).
The light-colored abrasive dust settling into the recessed nooks and crannies of a seal during drilling would have established a helpful figure-ground relationship.
But the discs are not autonomously drawn circles; rather, they're produced by changes in the color of the gridded lines, distorting the figure-ground relationship and ushering in an irreconcilable visual instability.
This, it seemed to me, would have produced a perfectly integrated figure-ground relationship.
Thus the other paintings were all individual pieces, at eye level, yet with carefully proportioned relationships among one another, as well as with what one might call a figure-ground relationship with the supporting wall.
Channeling tactics of Lucio Fontana and Photoshop, the artist improves an aggressively scumbled composition by upending its center and giving it a hard-edged figure-ground relationship.
The figure-ground relationship is destabilized by the fact that the white, irregular shapes enclosed by the black rectangle also, at their bases, bleed into the rectangle's white surround.
It's only when you establish a figure-ground relationship [that] you can convey information.
Each part becomes a kind of figure that can stand out against the others; focusing on one changes the figure-ground relationship.
This uncomfortable figure-ground relationship (suggesting, in a way, a kind of diabolical power-struggle) is typical of Reichman's work.