configuration

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configuration

 [kon-fig″u-ra´shun]
1. the general form, shape, or appearance of an object.
2. in chemistry, the arrangement in space of the atoms of a molecule.

con·fig·u·ra·tion

(kon-fig'yū-rā'shŭn),
1. The general form of a body and its parts.
2. chemistry the spatial arrangement of atoms in a molecule. The configuration of a compound (for example, a sugar) is the unique spatial arrangement of its atoms such that no other arrangement of these atoms is superimposable thereon with complete correspondence, regardless of changes in conformation (that is, twisting or rotation about single bonds); a change of configuration requires the breaking and rejoining of bonds, as in going from d to l configurations of sugars. Compare: conformation.

configuration

(kən-fĭg′yə-rā′shən)
n.
The arrangement of parts or elements in a pattern or form, as:
a. Chemistry The structural arrangement of atoms in a compound or molecule.
b. Computers The way in which a computer system or network is set up or connected.
c. Psychology Gestalt.

con·fig′u·ra′tion·al·ly adv.
con·fig′u·ra′tive, con·fig′u·ra′tion·al adj.

configuration

[kənfig′yərā′shən]
Etymology: L, configuare, to form from
the hardware, software, and peripherals assembled to work as a computer unit for a specific situation or purpose.

con·fig·u·ra·tion

(kŏn-fig'yūr-ā'shŭn)
1. The general form of a body and its parts.
2. chemistry The spatial arrangement of atoms in a molecule. The configuration of a compound (e.g., a sugar) is the unique spatial arrangement of its atoms, on which no other arrangement of these atoms can be superimposed with complete correspondence.
Compare: conformation

configuration

1. in anatomical terms the general form of a body.
2. in chemistry, the arrangement in space of the atoms of a molecule.
References in periodicals archive ?
Peter Martyr similarly distances the sacramental figuration he embraces from dramatic fiction as he seeks to rationalize why some of the Patristic writers spoke of the sacrament in an "unpossible" or realistic way.
Figurations of sodomitical royal patronage -- in literary fictions and libels -- reflect this concern.
The chapters move chronologically, from Plath to Howe, but they also can be grouped so as to highlight the three kinds of figuration that are central to Keniston's account.
Abstraction and figuration tear at their very seams.
Again, the detail in the figuration is utterly realistic, while the colors are not so restricted.
Between stanzas, the piano returns to the opening figuration and then repeats the sequence of sections, ending with a very fast coda.
But somehow, Gavin says, drawing and figuration in the traditional sense fell out of favour in the mid-20th century.
Both use visual motifs: figuration through weaving in one case and through cinematography in the other.
Within the exhibition, viewers will witness the progression of Shaikh Rashid's work from landscape to figuration, from figuration towards abstraction and finally, to convex art.
As against common language use, with its wealth of cliches and idioms, and the so-called "literary language" characterized by a heightened figuration and denser rhetoric, Beckett's texts decreate literary works that redefine the act of reading; they constitute events by virtue of linguistic surfaces that work as blanks, writings without style, (2) forever striving towards pure denotation, the perfected present of writing.
In the middle section, the left-hand figuration changes to a two-note pattern creating a lilting and cheerful mood.
Generally speaking, the evolution of this figuration reflected a changing balance of power due to the relative decline of the old nobility.