field

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field

 [fēld]
1. an area or open space, as an operative field or visual field.
2. a range of specialization in knowledge, study, or occupation.
3. in embryology, the developing region within a range of modifying factors.
auditory field the space or range within which stimuli will be perceived as sound.
disturbed energy field a nursing diagnosis defined as a disruption of the flow of energy surrounding a person's being that results in disharmony of the body, mind, and/or spirit.
energy field the flow of energy surrounding a person.
extended field in radiation therapy, such as for malignant lymphoma, an area of irradiation beyond the involved field. See also under irradiation.
high-power field the area of a slide visible under the high magnification system of a microscope.
individuation field a region in which an organizer influences adjacent tissue to become a part of a total embryo.
inverted Y field in radiation therapy, such as for malignant lymphoma, a circumscribed area of irradiation below the diaphragm, covering the spleen, extending down the midline, and branching inferiorly to form tails across the inguinal areas.
involved field in radiation therapy, such as for malignant lymphoma, the irradiated area when irradiation has been limited to sites of detectable macroscopic disease. See also under irradiation.
low-power field the area of a slide visible under the low magnification system of a microscope.
magnetic field that portion of space about a magnet in which its action is perceptible.
mantle field in radiation therapy, such as for malignant lymphoma, a circumscribed area of irradiation around the shoulders and chest, including the neck, clavicular regions, axillae, and mediastinum. See also under irradiation.
morphogenetic field an embryonic region out of which definite structures normally develop.
operating field (operative field) an isolated area where surgery is performed; it must be kept sterile by aseptic techniques (see surgical asepsis). Called also surgical field.
sterile field an operative field that is properly sterile according to surgical asepsis. It includes having all furniture and equipment covered with sterile drapes and all personnel being properly attired.
surgical field operative field.
visual field (F) (vf) the area within which stimuli will produce the sensation of sight with the eye in a straight-ahead position.

field

(fēld),
A definite area of plane surface, considered in relation to some specific object.
[A.S. feld]

field

(fēld)
1. an area or open space, as an operative field or visual field.
2. a range of specialization in knowledge, study, or occupation.
3. in embryology, the developing region within a range of modifying factors.

auditory field  the space or range within which stimuli may be perceived as sound.
individuation field  a region in which an organizer influences adjacent tissue to become a part of a total embryo.
morphogenetic field  an embryonic region out of which definite structures normally develop.
visual field  (F) (vf) the area within which stimuli will produce the sensation of sight with the eye in a straight-ahead position.

field

Etymology: AS, feld
1 a defined space, area, or distance. The field of vision represents the total area that can be seen with one fixed eye. The binocular field is the area that can be seen with both eyes.
2 an area within a computer record where a specified type of data is stored.

field

A locus on a data collection tool—usually a case report form—for recording or displaying a data element.

field

(fēld)
A definite area of plane surface, considered in relation to some specific object.

field

(feld)
1. An open expanse of land.
2. A discipline or an area of study.
3. A region of space in which a given force operates or a given condition exists.
4. A place of natural conditions, as opposed to a controlled environment, such as a laboratory or a hospital.

auditory field

The spatial region in which a given person can hear sounds.

cortical field

A segment of the cerebral cortex that carries out a given function. For example, the front of the parietal lobe -- the postcentral gyrus -- can be called a primary somatosensory field, and the parietal cortex farther back can be called an association field.

dry field

A colloquial term for a bloodless surgical field in which the surgeon's vision is not obscured.

electric field

The region in space in which the attractive or repulsive effects of a given electric charge have an effect.

electromagnetic field

Abbreviation: EMF
The region in space in which the photons produced by moving electric charges have an effect. EMFs can be produced by power lines, radio waves, and microwaves. The energy produced in an EMF increases as the frequency of the photons increases, and EMFs produced by very high frequency photons (e.g., xrays and gamma rays) are sufficiently energetic to induce cancer.

eye field

Any region of the cortex concerned with sensation from or movement of an eye.

field of fixation

The widest limits of vision in all directions within which the eyes can fixate.

field of Forel

One the layers of axons -- many originating in the globus pallidus -- that form the lower (inferior) border of the thalamus in the brain. Together, the axons and neighboring neuronss are called the subthalamic reticular nucleus.
Synonym: Forel's field, prerubral field

free field

A space in which there are no surfaces that reflect specific frequencies of sound.

gradient-induced electric field

An electric field that may surround an object placed in a rapidly changing magnetic environment, such as one generated by a magnetic resonance imaging device.

gravitational field

The region in space in which the attractive effects of a given mass have an effect.

hand field

Any region of the cortex concerned with sensation from or movement of a hand.

heart field

The region of the embryo destined to produce the heart.

high-power field

The portion of an object seen when the high-magnification lenses of a microscope are used.

hippocampal field

Any of the three contiguous, but histologically distinguishable, sheets of cells that form the cortex of the hippocampus; the fields are usually called CA1, CA2, and CA3.

low-power field

The portion of an object seen when the low-magnification lenses of a microscope are used.

lung field

The region in the body containing a lung. Often, 'lung field' refers to the section of a medical image (e.g., chest xray) that shows a lung.

magnetic field

The space permeated by the magnetic lines of force surrounding a permanent magnet or coil of wire carrying electric current.

prerubral field

Field of Forel.

pulsing electromagnetic field

Abbreviation: PEMF
An alternating electrical current used to produce an electromagnetic field. This may induce healing when applied to a fractured bone. The field is applied noninvasively to the affected limb. It may be moderately helpful in treating bony nonunion. See: diathermy

receptive field

A description of the effective stimuli of a given neuron. For sensory receptor neurons, the receptive field is the type of effective stimulation (e.g., light, sound, mechanical pressure) and the range of sensitive locations (e.g., center of visual field, left auditory field, tip of right thumb).

sterile field

A body surface, along with surrounding drapes or towels, within which an operation may safely take place without introducing potentially hazardous microorganisms into a patient.

Patient care

The field is prepared by meticulously washing and scrubbing the patient on whom an operation will be performed with disinfectant solution. Sterile drapes and towels are placed over the patient to cover any unprepared skin or clothing with sterilized fabric. All surgical instruments that enter the operative theatre are cleansed according to decontamination and sterilization practices. Finally, all surgical personnel scrub for prescribed time periods with disinfectants before entering the operating room. They must wear sterile gloves, gowns, masks and shoe covers and replace these if any of them contact nonprepared items during surgery.

surgical field

The area in which an operation is performed. This field is prepared and covered to maintain sterility during operations.

useful field of view

Abbreviation: UFOV
A test of visual attention that measures the space in which an individual can receive information rapidly from two separate sources. It is a strong predictor of accidents in older drivers. Training can expand the useful field of view and increase the visual processing speed of an elderly person.

field of vision

Visual field.
Enlarge picture
VISUAL FIELD

visual field

The area within which objects may be seen when the eye is fixed.
Synonym: field of vision See: illustration; perimetry

field,

n three-dimensional zone in which an array of forces interact in tangible, recognizable ways.

field

A limited area.
binocular visual field An approximately circular zone of radius about 60º centred on the point of fixation (slightly larger in the lower part of the field) in which an object stimulates both retinas simultaneously. Beyond that area on each side, the visual field is monocular. See visual field.
field of excursion See field of fixation.
field of fixation The area in space over which an eye can fixate when the head remains stationary. The field of fixation is smaller than the field of vision. It extends to approximately 47º temporally, 45º nasally, 43º upward and 50º downward. Syn. field of excursion; motor field. See apparent field of view; real field of view; visual field.
field glasses See binoculars.
keyhole visual field A term used to describe a visual field defect in which there is a bilateral homonymous hemianopia with macular sparing. An occipital lobe lesion sparing the posterior tips of the occipital lobe usually causes this lesion.
field lens See eyepiece.
motor field See field of fixation.
receptive field The retinal area within which a light stimulus can produce a potential difference in a single cell. Retinal ganglion receptive fields are circular, often with a response different in the centre than in the periphery (also referred to as on-centre/off-centre or centre/surround organization). Ganglion cell receptive fields are very small in the macular region and large in the periphery of the retina. Receptive fields also exist in the lateral geniculate bodies where they are similar to those of the retina. In the visual cortex they have various shapes and sizes and may only respond to either a vertical bar or a black dot moving in a given direction and at a given speed, etc. Receptive fields reflect the interaction between excitation and inhibition between neighbouring neurons. The term can also describe the region of space that induces these neural responses (Fig. F2). See complex cell; hypercomplex cell; simple cell; lateral inhibition; summation.
field stop See diaphragm.
surrounding field That area of the field of view surrounding any object.
field of view The extent of an object plane seen through an optical instrument.
field of view, apparent Angle subtended by the exit port of a sighting instrument or an empty frame aperture at the centre of the entrance pupil of the eye. Syn. apparent peripheral field of view. Note: when referring to the apparent field of fixation, the reference point is the centre of rotation of the eye. Syn. apparent macular field of view (Fig. F3). See field of fixation.
field of view, real Angle subtended by the effective diameter of a lens at the point conjugate with the centre of the entrance pupil of the eye. Syn. real peripheral field of view; true field of view. Note: when referring to the real field of fixation, the reference point is the centre of rotation of the eye. Syn. real macular field of view (Fig. F3). See jack-in-the-box phenomenon.
field of vision See visual field.
visual field (VF) The extent of space in which objects are visible to an eye in a given position. The extent of the visual field tends to diminish with age. The visual field can be measured either monocularly or binocularly. In the horizontal plane meridian the visual field extends to nearly 190º with both eyes open, the area seen binocularly, that is the region where both eyes can see the simulus is about 120º, and the area seen by one eye only is about 154º. Syn. field of vision. See binocular visual field; kinetic perimetry; static perimetry; confrontation test; island of vision.
visual field expander  An optical system designed to enlarge the field of vision. The most common types are reverse telescopes (e.g. looking through the objective of a galilean telescope), which minify objects being viewed but present more information by means of the enlarged visual field. They are usually of low power because of the reduction in visual acuity induced by the minification of the image. Prisms can also be used to expand the visual field. These systems are used mainly to improve mobility in patients with glaucoma and retinitis pigmentosa who have constricted visual fields or tunnel vision.
Fig. F2 Typical responses from receptive fields of retinal ganglion cells to a spot of light shone on the area indicated by the bars in each type of receptive field. on-centre cells respond best when stimulated in the central part of the field. off-centre cells respond best when stimulated in the surround of the fieldenlarge picture
Fig. F2 Typical responses from receptive fields of retinal ganglion cells to a spot of light shone on the area indicated by the bars in each type of receptive field. 'on'-centre cells respond best when stimulated in the central part of the field. 'off'-centre cells respond best when stimulated in the surround of the field
Fig. F3 Apparent and real field of view seen through A, a converging lens, and B, a diverging lens, placed in a diaphragm. The apparent field of view is decreased by the converging lens and increased by the diverging lens (E, centre of the entrance pupil; E′, its image formed by the lens)enlarge picture
Fig. F3 Apparent and real field of view seen through A, a converging lens, and B, a diverging lens, placed in a diaphragm. The apparent field of view is decreased by the converging lens and increased by the diverging lens (E, centre of the entrance pupil; E′, its image formed by the lens)

Table F2 Average extent of the normal visual field (in degrees) of one eye of a young adult looking in the straight-ahead position, and measured with a white target subtending 1.0º under normal room illumination
temporally94º
down and temporally88º
down70º
down and nasally54º
nasally60º
up and nasally56º
up54º
up and temporally64º

field

(fēld)
A definite area of plane surface, considered in relation to some specific object.

field,

n an area, region, or space.
field block,
n See block, field.
field, operating,
n the area immediately surrounding and directly involved in a treatment procedure (e.g., all the teeth included in a rubber dam application for the restoration of a single tooth or portions thereof).
field, radiation,
n the region in which radiant energy is being propagated.

field

1. an area or open space, such as an operative field or visual field.
2. a range of specialization in knowledge, study or occupation.
3. in embryology, the developing region within a range of modifying factors.

auditory field
the space or range within which stimuli will be perceived as sound.
field beans
field experiments
experiments conducted on large groups of animals in conditions thought to be average for the particular type of commercial operation.
field fever
leptospirosis.
field fungi
fungi that attack plants that grow in the field. See also storage fungi.
high-power field
the area of a slide visible under the high magnification system of a microscope.
individuation field
a region in which an organizer influences adjacent tissue to become a part of a total embryo.
low-power field
the area of a slide visible under the low magnification system of a microscope.
morphogenetic field
an embryonic region out of which definite structures normally develop.
field nettle
field pea
pisumsativum.
field penny-cress
field poppy
see papaverrhoeas.
sequential field trial
a trial to which additional segments are added as results are obtained in original segments, e.g. concentrating efforts on aspects of the work which appear to be promising.
field trial
see field experiments (above).
visual field
the area within which stimuli will produce the sensation of sight with the eye in a straight-ahead position.

Patient discussion about field

Q. is there like a big break through in the field of autism therapy and approaching?

A. there is a large amount of research on Autism. Social, neurological, psychiatric etc. today because of new imagine equipment there is better understanding of how our brain works (there are much more to be revealed but still). And there are breakthroughs all the time. You can get updated about research on the subject in this site:
http://www.autism-society.org/site/PageServer?pagename=research_home

Q. My mother works in the medical field. I don’t want to discuss with my parents.I would appreciate your answer. I have some of the symptoms of ADHD for the past recent months. I am aware of the symptoms and now I feel the symptoms in me. People only notice these things as funny little quirks but this affects me severely. My mother works in the medical field. I don’t want to discuss with my parents. I would appreciate your answer.

A. You are not making use of your mother’s help at the right time. I shall suggest you to discuss your problem with your mom. She can offer you the right support and guidance. I doubt whether she possess experience in the area of your problem. But it is wise to discuss this to your parents. This may also be the reason for you having developed the symptoms of ADHD (not being social). Feel free to discuss with your parents.

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