fictive kin

fictive kin

[fik′tiv]
people who are regarded as being part of a family even though they are not related by either blood or marriage bonds. Fictive kinship may bind people together in ties of affection, concern, obligation, and responsibility.

fictive kin

(fik′tiv)
A group of individuals chosen as a surrogate family by a genetically unrelated person; an adopted family.
References in periodicals archive ?
Fictive Kin legislation was passed and signed into law by my husband as well.
4 Rebuilding social bonds--since "doing time is a communal act," writes Lempert, and incarcerated women build fictive kin and friendship networks even in an environment that breeds distrust.
More importantly, the intimacy generated by living together may create strong emotional bonds that cause fictive kin to act like kin, or more extended kin to act like adult children.
It could be said that fictive kin address is very much part of Kelabit custom.
In this sense, the focus is on the survival of the group rather than the individual within the African American imagined community of fictive kin.
Analytically separating Black southerners from their migrating cousins, fictive kin, and white counterparts, Robinson demonstrates how place intersects with race, class, gender, and regional identities and differences.
Harland prudently notes the differences in vocabulary between epistolary and epigraphic sources (67), with abundant evidence of fictive kin language in earliest Christian letters contrasted with little use of this language in Christian inscriptions before the late second century, and suggests that the apparent rarity of this language in non-Christian inscriptions should not be taken to indicate rarity of use overall.
Most important, the chapter reveals the sharp divide between the Civil Code and the fictive kin relations that developed as a result of child circulation.
However, Collins claims that modern clans, defined as networks of individuals linked through kinship and fictive kin identities (p.
It then reviews the emerging conceptualisation of youth permanency in child welfare practice that focuses on lifelong connections to kin and fictive kin as requirements for permanency.