fictive kin


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fictive kin

[fik′tiv]
people who are regarded as being part of a family even though they are not related by either blood or marriage bonds. Fictive kinship may bind people together in ties of affection, concern, obligation, and responsibility.

fictive kin

(fik′tiv)
A group of individuals chosen as a surrogate family by a genetically unrelated person; an adopted family.
References in periodicals archive ?
Families are defined as the caregivers and other household members, including but not limited to parents, step-parents, extended family and fictive kin, with an identified child under the age of 18 years eligible to receive CSA services.
Analytically separating Black southerners from their migrating cousins, fictive kin, and white counterparts, Robinson demonstrates how place intersects with race, class, gender, and regional identities and differences.
In addition to Danzico, Lee, Kelley and Tatarko, program advisors include Josh Berman , Co-Founder & CEO, BeachMint ; Cameron Koczon , Partner, Fictive Kin ; Akshay Kothari , Co-Founder & CEO, Pulse ; Stew Langille , CEO, Visual.
Harland prudently notes the differences in vocabulary between epistolary and epigraphic sources (67), with abundant evidence of fictive kin language in earliest Christian letters contrasted with little use of this language in Christian inscriptions before the late second century, and suggests that the apparent rarity of this language in non-Christian inscriptions should not be taken to indicate rarity of use overall.
Most important, the chapter reveals the sharp divide between the Civil Code and the fictive kin relations that developed as a result of child circulation.
It then reviews the emerging conceptualisation of youth permanency in child welfare practice that focuses on lifelong connections to kin and fictive kin as requirements for permanency.
Multigenerations providing support and care for family members and fictive kin (non-blood relatives) across the life course have been well documented (Billingsley, 1992; Billingsley & Morrison-Rodriguez, 1998; Hill, 1971, 1993, 1998, 1999; Martin & Martin, 1985; McAdoo, 1998; Schiele, 1996, 2000).
In particular, she notes how the generalized reciprocity that was practiced by this new fictive kin group--a radically inclusive group defined by allegiance to Jesus as Messiah--was necessary for spiritual and physical survival.
Hall investigates the effect of kin and fictive kin relationships on the coping responses of African American young adults who live with an alcoholic parent or caregiver.
The importance of extended family and tribal communities encouraged taking in and looking after other children through informal adoption, foster care and fictive kin relationships.
The first-generation, New World children seek, in Patterson's words, "to anchor the living present in [a] conscious community of memory" (5); and the Africans they encounter, whether actual relatives or fictive kin, transmit to them elements of a West African world view and call them into the community of their ancestors.
Moreover, the Christian church has a long history of creating fictive kin.