fibroxanthoma

fi·bro·xan·tho·ma

(fī'brō-zan-thō'mă),
A fibrohistiocytic neoplasm.

fibroxanthoma

/fi·bro·xan·tho·ma/ (fi″bro-zan-tho´mah) a type of xanthoma containing fibromatous elements, sometimes described as synonymous with or a subtype of either benign or malignant fibrous histiocytoma.
atypical fibroxanthoma  (AFX) a small cutaneous nodular neoplasm usually occurring on sun-exposed areas of the face and neck; sometimes described as related to or a subtype of either benign or malignant fibrous histiocytoma.

benign fibrous histiocytoma

A benign tumour composed of primitive mesenchymal cells (macrophages or histiocytes) seen in the skin and soft tissues of the legs of young to middle-aged patients, more commonly women, usually in relation to skeletal muscle.
 
Management
Excision.

fibroxanthoma

a xanthoma with a significant accumulation of fibrous elements.
References in periodicals archive ?
Undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma often involves the deeper soft tissue, (21,22) while atypical fibroxanthoma often occurs in the sun-exposed areas and is a dermal-based tumor.
Since its first observation in the lung in 1939, many different terms have been coined to describe IPT, such as inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor, plasma cell granuloma, inflammatory myofibrohistiocytic proliferation, inflammatory fibrosarcoma, xanthoma, xanthogranuloma, fibroxanthoma, histiocytoma, xanthomatous pseudotumor, plasmocytoma, and solitary mast cell granuloma, indicating the complex and diverse nature of this entity (1).
Less common skin cancers include melanoma, Merkel cell carcinoma, a typical fibroxanthoma.
Differential diagnosis of GCT-ST includes soft tissue mesenchymal tumour which are rich in giant cell, villonodular sinuvitis, cellular dermatofibroma, atypical fibroxanthoma, plexiform fibrohistiocytic tumour, malignant fibrous histiocytoma, leiomyosarcoma, extraskeletal osteosarcoma and epithelioid sarcoma.
Differential diagnoses for MO include osteosarcoma, malignant fibrous histiocytoma, osteochondroma, foreign-body granuloma, giant cell tumor of soft tissue (osteoclastoma), atypical fibroxanthoma, pseudosarcomatous fibromatosis (nodular fasciitis), and deep vein thrombosis.
Actinic Keratosis, Kaposi's sarcoma, Bowen's disease, Dermatofibroma, Atypical fibroxanthoma constituted the remaining.
The clinical differential diagnosis for pilomatricoma in children includes epidermal inclusion cyst, ossifying hematoma, branchial remnant, preauricular sinus, lymphadenopathy, giant cell tumor, chondroma, dermoid cyst, degenerating fibroxanthoma, foreign body reaction, and osteoma cutis [2].
This tumor is believed to be secondary to UV exposure, but unlike lentigo maligna, atypical fibroxanthoma (AFX) seems to be confined to an older population.
The differential diagnosis includes ossifying hematoma, branchial cyst, adenopathy, preauricular cyst, giant-cell tumor, chondroma, fibroxanthoma, foreignbody reaction, and osteoma cutis.
Skin cancer can include squamous cell carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma, melanoma, sarcoma, Merkel cell carcinoma, angiosarcoma, verrucous carcinoma, atypical fibroxanthoma, and leiomyosarcoma.
Atypical fibroxanthoma (AFX) has been a topic for debate since the 1960s, when Helwig (1) coined its present name.
The differential diagnosis includes benign or malignant cutaneous tumors, such as basal cell carcinoma, keratoacanthoma, squamous cell carcinoma actinic keratosis, atypical fibroxanthoma , cystic chondromalacia, elastotic nodules of the ears, Merkel cell carcinoma, perforating dermatoses, gouty tophi, verruca vulgaris, molluscum contagiosum, cutaneous horn and pseudocyst of the auricle.