chondroid tissue

(redirected from fibrohyaline tissue)

chon·droid tis·sue

1. in an adult, tissue resembling cartilage; Synonym(s): fibrohyaline tissue, pseudocartilage
2. in an embryo, an early stage in cartilage formation.

chon·droid tis·sue

(kon'droyd tish'ū)
1. In an adult, tissue resembling cartilage;
Synonym(s): pseudocartilage.
2. In an embryo, an early stage in cartilage formation.

tissue

(tish'oo) [Fr. tissu, from L. texere, to weave]
A group or collection of similar cells and their intercellular substance that perform a particular function. The four major groups are epithelial, connective, muscular, and nervous tissues.

adipose tissue

Fat.

areolar tissue

A form of loose connective tissue consisting of fibroblasts in a matrix of tissue fluid and collagen and elastin fibers. Many white blood cells are present. It is found subcutaneously and beneath the epithelium of all mucous membranes. See: connective tissue for illus
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BONE TISSUE

bone tissue

Osseous tissue.illustration

bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue

Abbreviation: BALT
Lymph nodules that contain clusters of T and B lymphocytes and macrophages within the mucosa of the bronchial wall; a component of the mucosal immune system that defends all mucosal surfaces against pathogens.
See: mucosal immune system

brown adipose tissue

Abbreviation: BAT
Brown fat..

cancellous tissue

Spongy bone with many marrow cavities. It is present at the ends of long bones and in the interior of most flat bones.

chondroid tissue

Embryonic cartilage.

chordal tissue

Tissue of the notochord or derived from it. The nucleus pulposus is derived from the notochord.

chromaffin tissue

Chromaffin system.

cicatricial tissue

Scar.
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CONNECTIVE TISSUES

connective tissue

Tissue that supports and connects other tissues and parts of the body. Connective tissue has comparatively few cells. Its bulk consists of intercellular substance or matrix, whose nature gives each type of connective tissue its particular properties. The vascular supply varies: cartilage, none; fibrous, poor; adipose, good; and bone, abundant. Connective tissue includes the following types: areolar, adipose, fibrous, elastic, reticular, cartilage, and bone. Blood may also be considered a connective tissue.
illustration

elastic tissue

A form of connective tissue in which yellow elastic fibers predominate. It is found in certain ligaments, the walls of blood vessels, esp. the larger arteries, and around the alveoli of the lungs.

embryonic tissue

Any tissue that arises from the fertilization of an ovum and has not become differentiated or specialized.

endothelial tissue

Endothelium.

epithelial tissue

Epithelium.

erectile tissue

Spongy tissue, the spaces of which fill with blood, causing it to harden and expand. It is found in the penis, clitoris, and nipples.

fatty tissue

Fat.

fibrous tissue

Connective tissue consisting principally of collagen fibers. Also called white fibrous or dense connective tissue; may be regular (parallel fibers) or irregular.

gelatiginous tissue

Tissue from which gelatin may be obtained by treating it with hot water.

glandular tissue

A group of epithelial cells capable of producing secretions.

granulation tissue

The newly formed vascular and connective tissue produced in the early stages of wound healing.

hard tissue

In dentistry, the term used to denote any of the three calcified tissue components of the tooth: enamel, dentin, and cementum.

homologous tissues

Tissues that are identical in structure.

indifferent tissue

Tissue composed of undifferentiated cells as in embryonic tissue.

interstitial tissue

Connective tissue that forms a network with the cellular portions of an organ.

lymphadenoid tissue

Aggregates of lymphatic tissue found in the spleen and lymph nodes.

lymphoid tissue

Collections of lymphocytes in all stages of development found in the spleen, thymus, lymph nodes, lymph nodules of the digestive tract (tonsils, Peyer's patches), and the respiratory, urinary, and reproductive tracts.

mesenchymal tissue

The embryonic mesenchyme.

mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue

Abbreviation: MALT
Aggregates of T and B lymphocytes found in all mucous membranes, a line of defense against infection. Examples include Peyer's patches in the small intestine and lymph nodules in the colon, trachea, and bronchi. MALT contains CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and activated B cells and may occasionally undergo malignant transformation into lymphomas.
See: mucosal immune system

mucous tissue

The jellylike connective tissue of the umbilical cord.

muscular tissue

Muscle.

myeloid tissue

The bone marrow in which most blood cells are formed.

nerve tissue

The neurons and neuroglia of the nervous system.
See: neuron

osseous tissue

Bone, a connective tissue with a matrix of calcium phosphate and calcium carbonate surrounding osteocytes
Synonym: bone tissue See: bone

reticular tissue

A type of connective tissue consisting of delicate fibers forming interlacing networks. Fibers stain selectively with silver stains and are called argyrophil fibers. Reticular tissue supports blood cells in lymph nodes, bone marrow, and the spleen.

scar tissue

Scar.

sclerous tissue

Firm connective tissue such as bone and cartilage.

skeletal tissue

Bone.

soft tissue

Any noncalcified tissue in the body. This term is especially used in relation to muscles, tendons, ligaments, skin, fat, and other connective tissues that are occasionally the source of pain when they are injured. Unlike bones or joints, which can be fractured or dislocated, soft tissues are bruised or inflamed by trauma. In surgery, soft tissues are dissected. By contrast, components of the (hard) bony skeleton are sawed, chiselled, or drilled. Soft tissues include all types of tissue except bone, i.e., all epithelial, muscle, and nerve tissue, as well as connective tissue excluding bone.

splenic tissue

The highly vascular splenic pulp.

subcutaneous tissue

Superficial fascia.