fibrinoid necrosis


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Related to fibrinoid necrosis: Coagulative necrosis

fi·brin·oid ne·cro·sis

necrosis in which the necrotic tissue has some staining reactions resembling fibrin and becomes deeply eosinophilic, homogenous, and refractile.

fibrinoid necrosis

'Smudgy' eosinophilic fibrin-like deposits, of degenerated collagen or ground substance, in arterial walls of Pts with malignant HTN and periarteritis nodosa; FN may also occur in the Arthus reaction, acute rheumatic fever, SBE, near peptic ulcers, rheumatoid arthritis, immune complex disease, HBV, malignancy, complement C2 deficiency, Henoch-Schönlein purpura, SLE and other collagen vascular diseases. See Fibrosis, Necrosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Decidual acute atherosis showing fibrinoid necrosis, lipid-laden histiocytes, and perivascular lymphocytes (hematoxylin-eosin, original magnification X20).
This leads to spasm and swelling of the villi of the placenta, their leukocyte infiltration, fibrinoid necrosis, cleavage of the endoplasmic reticulum, basement membrane thickening, and disturbed gas exchange between mother and fetus.
C, Trichrome-stained section demonstrating extensive damage to the vascular wall with fibrinoid necrosis.
In grade 4 hypertensive retinopathy, the systemic diastolic blood pressure is usually at least 130 to 140 mmHg, With both grades 3 and 4 hypertensive retinopathy, the increased blood pressure can damage the blood vessel wall, leading to fibrinoid necrosis (the presence of fibrin thromhi within the vascular luminal.
With cerebral amyloid angiopathy, there is progressive amyloid deposition restricted to small- to medium-sized vessels of the brain that leads to fibrinoid necrosis and vascular frailty, and there is often associated diffuse multifocal white matter disease, and symptomatic lobar hemorrhage.
The parameters of renal lesion, hypercellularity, infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN), fibrinoid necrosis, focal and segmental proliferation and interstitial infiltration, were reversed.
In this case the clinical and histopathological findings did not fulfill the criteria of eosinophilic vasculitis in which there should be damage to the elastic fibers or fibrinoid necrosis concomitant to eosinophilic cellular infiltration.
Histopathology revealed severe fibrinonecrotic enteritis associated with large numbers of gram-negative bacteria, multifocal fibrinoid necrosis in portal arteries, accumulation of fibrin in hepatic sinusoids, myocardial degeneration, and necrosis.
Signs of fibrinoid necrosis, endothelial swelling and nuclear dust were detected.
The resultant classic histopathological findings of pulmonary capillaritis are interstitial erythrocytes, capillary wall fibrinoid necrosis, inter-alveolar septal capillary occlusion, interstitial and alveolar space neutrophils, as well as interalveolar septal fibrin clots.
Placental findings also include fibrinoid necrosis, atherosis of decidual vessels, and intimal thickening.
6,18,22) Fibrinoid necrosis has been described in some but not all cases (7,8,10,15,16) (Figure).