fibrin sealant


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fibrin sealant

mixed fibrinogen and thrombin applied to sites to curtail hemorrhage or as a delivery mechanism to provide regional long-term growth factor or other drug delivery.
Synonym(s): fibrin glue

fibrin sealant

A biological agent used to help control bleeding in those injuries or surgeries in which cautery, ligation, or suturing do not provide adequate hemostasis.
Synonym: fibrin glue.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bioseal manufactures a porcine-derived fibrin sealant, named Bioseal, currently the only porcine plasma-derived fibrin sealant approved for use in China.
After the phrenic nerve block, the fistula was brushed gently at bronchoscopy to encourage bleeding and subsequent granulation, and 2 mls of topical fibrin sealant Tisseel [TM] (Baxter Healthcare Corporation, Westlake Village, CA 91362 USA) was applied.
The parties have entered into a Distribution Agreement whereby Angiotech is granted non-exclusive, world-wide distribution rights to Haemacure's fibrin sealant product candidate in selected surgical indications.
Haemacure plans on having a first patient undergo surgery in the planned pivotal Phase II/Phase III clinical trials for its human fibrin sealant Hemaseel(R)HMN during the first quarter of calendar 2009.
have formed an exclusive, long-term partnership to develop and commercialize Biostat BIOLOGX Fibrin Sealant, a key element of Spinal Restoration's new biologic therapy for chronic low back pain.
Although the use of a fibrin sealant was first reported in 1940, (1) fibrin glue has been commercially available in the United States only since 1998.
The MedClose(TM) VCS is a proprietary catheter-based system that uses fibrin sealant to rapidly seal arterial puncture sites following angiography and angioplasty.
After just two years on the market, we captured 30 percent of the fibrin sealant market in the United States," says Paquin.
Fibrin sealant is a natural adhesive that promotes hemostasis, serves as a tissue sealant, and acts as a site-specific vehicle for the delivery of biologically active compounds.
By 1993, Hess was working with the American Red Cross, which was independently developing what it calls fibrin sealant bandages.
The new indication follows the publication of new Fibrin Sealant Guidelines in January 2005, which means that the indication for use is no longer limited to the procedures in which trials have been performed.

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