feverfew


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feverfew

 [fe´ver-fu″]
the dried leaves of the herb Tanacetum parthenium, used for migraine, arthritis, rheumatic diseases, and allergy.

feverfew

/fe·ver·few/ (-fu″) the dried leaves of the herb Tanacetum parthenium, used for migraine, arthritis, rheumatic diseases, and allergy, and for various uses in folk medicine.

feverfew

(fē′vər-fyo͞o′)
n.
An aromatic plant (Tanacetum parthenium syn. Chrysanthemum parthenium) native to Eurasia, having clusters of buttonlike, white-rayed flower heads and used as an herbal medicine primarily to treat migraine headaches.

feverfew

a perennial herb found throughout the world.
uses It is used for migraines, cluster headaches, fever, psoriasis, and inflammation. It is probably safe and effective when used over short terms at recommended levels of migraine prophylaxis and possibly safe for long-term use; it does not abort migraine attacks. There are insufficient reliable data for other uses.
contraindications Chewing the leaves, one of the traditional methods for ingesting the herb, can lead to mouth ulcerations. It should not be used during pregnancy and lactation, in children, or in those with known hypersensitivity to this herb.

fe·ver·few

(fē'vĕr-fyū)
(Chrysanthemum multiflorum) Herbal agent used in migraine headache and fever. Associated with ulceration of oral cavity, labial edema, and hypersensitivity reactions.
Synonym(s): bachelor's button, Santa Maria.
[L. febrifuga, febrifuge]

feverfew,

n Latin names:
Chrysanthemum parthenium, Tanacetum parthenium; part used: leaves; uses: abortifacient, abnormal menstruation, inflamed joints, fever; uses under research: migraines; precautions: pregnancy, lactation, children; can cause oral ulcers, nausea, and inflammation in muscles and joints. Also called
altamisa, bachelor's button, chamomile grande, featherfew, featherfoil, midsummer daisy, mutterkraut, nosebleed, Santa Maria, wild chamomile, and
wild quinine.

feverfew

tanacetum (Chrysanthemum) parthenium.
References in periodicals archive ?
It features a multicolored 'Autumn Beauty' sunflower, which is surrounded by 'Big Bear' sunflowers, orange Mexican sunflowers, golden sneezeweed, white feverfew, rosemary, and 'Green Tails' amaranth.
The mechanical hypersensitivity induced by repeated treatments with the anticancer drug oxaliplatin and with the antiviral dideoxycytidine was significantly reduced after a single injection of Feverfew flower extract.
The seeds of feverfew were provided by Zardband Pharmaceutical Company located in Tehran, Iran.
feverfew (dried leaf): up to 1200 mg daily in divided doses
MigraPure's feverfew and ginger gel is non-drowsy, non-habit forming, and not associated with rebound headaches.
Look about you at the brown-eyed Susan, oxeye daisy, Queen Anne's lace, feverfew, devil's paintbrush, New England asters and dozens of kinds of goldenrod seemingly growing without a care in field and meadow.
The topical use of purified feverfew extract is effective in preventing skin redness with higher efficacy when higher concentrations of the extract are added.
Drink a herbal tea of feverfew, which helps to relieve headaches, or chamomile and peppermint, which are calming.
Native to the Balkan Mountains, feverfew has been used for over two millennia as a traditional herbal medicine to prevent migraines.
Dried feverfew is as effective as the fresh leaves - spread them out in a single layer and turn regularly for several days before storing them in a tin.
The herb Feverfew is a member of the sunflower family and has been used for centuries to treat migraine.