feverfew


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feverfew

 [fe´ver-fu″]
the dried leaves of the herb Tanacetum parthenium, used for migraine, arthritis, rheumatic diseases, and allergy.

feverfew

/fe·ver·few/ (-fu″) the dried leaves of the herb Tanacetum parthenium, used for migraine, arthritis, rheumatic diseases, and allergy, and for various uses in folk medicine.

feverfew

(fē′vər-fyo͞o′)
n.
An aromatic plant (Tanacetum parthenium syn. Chrysanthemum parthenium) native to Eurasia, having clusters of buttonlike, white-rayed flower heads and used as an herbal medicine primarily to treat migraine headaches.

feverfew

a perennial herb found throughout the world.
uses It is used for migraines, cluster headaches, fever, psoriasis, and inflammation. It is probably safe and effective when used over short terms at recommended levels of migraine prophylaxis and possibly safe for long-term use; it does not abort migraine attacks. There are insufficient reliable data for other uses.
contraindications Chewing the leaves, one of the traditional methods for ingesting the herb, can lead to mouth ulcerations. It should not be used during pregnancy and lactation, in children, or in those with known hypersensitivity to this herb.

fe·ver·few

(fē'vĕr-fyū)
(Chrysanthemum multiflorum) Herbal agent used in migraine headache and fever. Associated with ulceration of oral cavity, labial edema, and hypersensitivity reactions.
Synonym(s): bachelor's button, Santa Maria.
[L. febrifuga, febrifuge]

feverfew,

n Latin names:
Chrysanthemum parthenium, Tanacetum parthenium; part used: leaves; uses: abortifacient, abnormal menstruation, inflamed joints, fever; uses under research: migraines; precautions: pregnancy, lactation, children; can cause oral ulcers, nausea, and inflammation in muscles and joints. Also called
altamisa, bachelor's button, chamomile grande, featherfew, featherfoil, midsummer daisy, mutterkraut, nosebleed, Santa Maria, wild chamomile, and
wild quinine.

feverfew

tanacetum (Chrysanthemum) parthenium.
References in periodicals archive ?
subcutaneously) on post infection hour 48 and daily oral intake of two capsules feverfew beginning on post infection hour 4 for 6 days.
Warn women of childbearing age that feverfew may cause uterine contractions and is contraindicated for those who are pregnant or trying to conceive.
Conclusion: The present Feverfew flower extract behaves as a potent pain reliever in acute, inflammatory, articular and neuropathic pain.
Gene response of human monocytic cells for the detection of antimigraine activity of feverfew extracts.
Biosynthesis and localization of parthenolide in glandular trichomes of feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium L.
PuraMed, Mitchell says, has changed that by combining the historically effective properties of feverfew with the latest manufacturing technology.
At least one specific feverfew extract is known to have strong anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity.
Results showed a significant difference between Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria in their susceptibility to the oil, so that Gram positive bacteria were more susceptible to the antimicrobial activity of feverfew oil.
Q I eat a lot of foods containing cinnamon and also take feverfew.
Feverfew is a perennial herbaceous plant belonging to the Asteraceae family.
Some product manufacturers are adding oatmeal ingredients, feverfew, licorice extract, or other natural "treatments" to their formulations, he said.
For migraines, the most commonly used supplements are magnesium, feverfew, coenzyme Q 10 (CoQ10), riboflavin, butterbur extract, and alpha lipoic acid.