fetal movement


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Related to fetal movement: Decreased Fetal Movement

fe·tal move·ment

the movement characteristic of the fetus in utero; usually commences between the 16th and 18th weeks of pregnancy.
See also: quickening.

fetal movement

Kicking Obstetrics The constellation of activity by the fetus in the uterus which, in healthy infants, averages 10/hr

fetal movement

Muscular movements performed by the fetus in utero.
See also: movement
References in periodicals archive ?
The monitoring of fetal movement is routinely done during the last trimester (and often earlier), and can be performed at-home manually by the mother herself.
Her blood pressure was 110/60 mmHg, urine tests were normal, and fetal movements were felt.
Interesting detailed research identifies facts such as "embryonic motility is not dependent on sensory input but is centrally generated" (p17); "adequate embryonic and fetal movements are necessary for the proper development of the skeletal, muscular and neural systems" (p19); "the variability and complexity of general movements is an indicator for the integrity of the young nervous system" (p26); "the developing brain permanently interacts with a variety of sensory stimuli" (p91) viz: auditory, tactile, olfactory stimuli in utero, in addition to external stimuli.
Violent fetal movements occurred 3 hours later, followed in 4 hours by the stillbirth of a term female infant.
A 30-year-old woman, 39 weeks pregnant, presented for a late third trimester US with a history of decreased fetal movements.
According to Sureau (1996), the development of the obstetric stethoscope facilitated a greater understanding of the fetal heart rate, including the relationship between accelerations of the fetal heart rate and fetal movements, as well as the lack of influence of maternal efforts such as those associated with ascending a staircase (i.
The Influence of Maternal Hypnosis on Fetal Movements in Anxious Pregnant Women.
A baby in distress usually slows down or stops moving so fetal movements can be an important early detector of trouble.
The mother presented with symptoms of decreased fetal movements in the initial instance, whereas the second and third cases were discovered during routine prenatal examinations.
The mother can keep track of the number of fetal movements within a specified time, usually ten episodes within eight hours.
We can monitor fetal movements to see if the central nervous system is developing normally.
In pregnant women, the toxin can affect the fetus, producing bizarre fetal movements and facial palsies in the newborn.