fetal lung maturity


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fetal lung maturity

Obstetrics A parameter that determines the likelihood a neonate will develop RDS; infants delivered at 40 ± 2 wks have 0% incidence of RDS; at 36 wks 0-2%, at 34 wks 8-34%–depending on birthweight

fetal lung maturity

The ability of the developing lung to oxygenate and ventilate effectively outside the womb. The lungs are the last fetal organ to mature. Surfactant, which allows the alveoli in the lungs to expand and not stick together, is secreted by the fetal lungs after 28 weeks. The readiness of the fetal lung can be assessed with several invasive, e.g., amniocentesis, and noninvasive, e.g., ultrasound, tests, all of which have some shortcomings. Some tests on amniotic fluid include: measurements of surfactant; phosphatidylglycerol; the lecithin/sphingomyelin ratio; and the number of lamellar bodies.

Patient care

Premature infants born with immature lungs have a high likelihood of developing infantile respiratory distress syndrome. Antenatal treatment with glucocorticoids improves most amniotic fluid indices of fetal lung maturity. Infants born with immature lungs are also often treated with continuous positive airway pressure, other forms of mechanical ventilation, and surfactant.

See also: maturity
References in periodicals archive ?
A recent paper by Bates and colleagues challenged that assumption and clearly demonstrated that even when fetal lung maturity was demonstrated, infants born before 39 weeks were significantly more likely to experience an adverse outcome (respiratory or otherwise).
The utility of the TDx test in the assessment of fetal lung maturity.
The proposed NQF guideline raises one other clinical issue: If you plan to deliver the hypothetical woman described at the beginning of this Editorial at 37 weeks and 4 days by elective repeat cesarean delivery, should you obtain evidence of fetal lung maturity by amniocentesis before performing the delivery?
To significantly diminish unnecessary prematurity and its associated morbidity, patient safety initiatives should include elective induction and C-section bundles that require either a gestational age of at least 39 weeks or documented fetal lung maturity.
Characterization of amniotic fluid lamellar bodies by resistivepulse counting: relationship to measures of fetal lung maturity.
Numerous tests for fetal lung maturity have been introduced since 1971 when the first test, the L/S ratio, was described; but there have really been no changes since 1988 when the LBC (lamellar body count) was first introduced.
Because this study lacked data about testing for fetal lung maturity, it is unclear whether the higher rate of adverse outcomes with elective cesarean delivery before 39 weeks could be explained by failure to assess for fetal lung maturity.
Standards of laboratory practice: evaluation of fetal lung maturity.
Beyond 32 weeks, the risk of severe complications of prematurity, including CP, is low if fetal lung maturity has been established by amniotic fluid samples collected vaginally or by amniocentesis.
In addition, patients with suspected placenta accreta are scheduled for cesarean deliveries at 36 weeks' gestation, following amniocentesis to determine fetal lung maturity.
A Tests for fetal lung maturity are based on the observation that as the fetal lung develops, there is an increase in certain lipids, especially lecithin (L), sphingomyelin (S) and phosphatidyl-glycerol (PG).
Studies of amniotic fluid have yielded IR models to quantify the lecithin /sphingomyelin ratio and the surfactant/ albumin ratio, establishing IR spectroscopy as an attractive option for the assessment of fetal lung maturity (7, 8).