zygote

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zygote

 [zi´gōt]
the cell resulting from union of a male and a female gamete; the fertilized ovum (see also reproduction). More precisely, the cell after synapsis at the completion of fertilization until first cleavage. adj., adj zygot´ic.
Development of the zygote. A, A sperm enters the ovum. B, The 23 chromosomes from the sperm mingle with the 23 chromosomes from the ovum, restoring the diploid number to 46. C, The fertilized ovum, now called a zygote, is ready for the first mitotic cell division. From McKinney et al., 2000.

zy·gote

(zī'gōt),
1. The diploid cell resulting from union of a sperm and a secondary oocyte. Compare: conceptus.
2. The early embryo that develops from a fertilized oocyte.
[G. zygōtos, yoked]

zygote

/zy·gote/ (zi´gōt) the diploid cell resulting from union of a male and a female gamete. More precisely, the cell after synapsis at the completion of fertilization until first cleavage.zygot´ic

zygote

(zī′gōt′)
n.
1. The cell formed by the union of two gametes, especially a fertilized ovum before cleavage.
2. The organism that develops from a zygote.

zy·got′ic (-gŏt′ĭk) adj.
zy·got′i·cal·ly adv.

zygote

[zī′gōt]
Etymology: Gk, zygon, yoke
the combined cell produced by the union of a sperm pronucleus and an egg pronucleus at the completion of fertilization until the first cleavage. Also called zygocyte.

zy·gote

(zī'gōt)
1. The diploid cell resulting from union of a sperm and an oocyte.
Compare: conceptus
2. The early embryo that develops from a fertilized oocyte.
[G. zygōtos, yoked]

zygote

An egg (ovum) that has been fertilized but has not yet undergone the first cleavage division. A zygote contains a complete (DIPLOID) set of chromosomes, half from ovum and half from the fertilizing sperm, and thus all the genetic code for a new individual.

zygote

the DIPLOID (1) cell produced by the fusion of the nuclei of male and female gamete nuclei at FERTILIZATION.

Zygote

The result of the sperm successfully fertilizing the ovum. The zygote is a single cell that contains the genetic material of both the mother and the father.

zy·gote

(zī'gōt)
1. Diploid cell resulting from union of a sperm and a secondary oocyte.
2. Early embryo that develops from a fertilized oocyte.
[G. zygōtos, yoked]

zygote

the cell resulting from union of a male and female gamete; the fertilized ovum. More precisely, the cell after synapsis at the completion of fertilization until first cleavage.
References in periodicals archive ?
If a fertilized egg is a person, then women could potentially be held accountable for engaging in "risky" health behavior that could prevent implantation of that egg.
The egg cell's remaining material -- its cytoplasm -- would reorganize the genes of the patient's genome, so that the donor's genes would recapitulate each embryonic stem-cell stage their ancestral cells went through soon after the earlier formation of the fertilized egg that would become the recipient.
They used fertilized eggs donated by couples undergoing fertility treatment, and which were unsuitable for in vitro fertilization (IVF), for the research.
Unless and until the fertilized egg implants into the triggering and life-supporting environment of a human uterus (approximately five to seven days after fertilization) or a yet-to-be-developed mechanical womb, it cannot go beyond the blastocyst stage.
Once a fertilized egg has gone through several rounds of division, stem cells form a bulge, called the inner cell mass, inside the early embryo.
The DNA content of a skin cell, a stem cell, and a fertilized egg are exactly the same.
An ectopic pregnancy occurs when a fertilized egg implants in a location other than the uterus, most commonly the fallopian tube.
Kato said he has already applied the technique to 11 couples and has been successful in nurturing five fertilized eggs to blastocyst -- the stage immediately before the fertilized egg's implantation -- from four couples.
The suit alleges that the couple's fertilized egg was stolen and then implanted in another fertility patient without their consent or knowledge.
It is now possible after a fertilized egg has first divided into two cells to take one cell and use it to test for genetic diseases.
In large doses, the pill encourages the early onset of menstrual bleeding, flushing out a fertilized egg before it can implant in the uterus.
An article by Stanford ethicist Ernle Young examining a key controversy in stem cell research: is a fertilized egg equivalent to a person?