ferritin test

ferritin test

a blood test used to determine available iron stores in the body. It is used to diagnose iron deficiency anemia, and when combined with the serum iron level and total iron-binding capacity tests, can differentiate and classify various kinds of anemias.
References in periodicals archive ?
If you are of menstruating age and your hair is falling out, ask your GP for a ferritin test.
Based on the ferritin test (an exam to measure the amount of stored iron in the body) ordered by the doctor, the couple's eldest child, Angelica, who is aged 20, has an iron overload of 11,000.
As there is no bedside ferritin test, screening would not be in real time.
They did a ferritin test (which measures iron levels in blood) - the normal level is 70-80 and his was 60,000.
The gold standard to determine iron stores is the ferritin test.
Routine blood screening doesn't include a ferritin test, which typically costs $50 to $100 if ordered separately.
Recent studies show serum ferritin has tremendous day-to-day variation in patients on hemodialysis, precluding reliable use of a single serum ferritin test to guide iron therapy (Ford, Coyne, Eby, Scott, 2008).
There is some selection bias in the ferritin data because only 52 of the 72 samples had a ferritin test, and 27 of the 52 ferritin concentrations were >1000 [micro]/L.
Two years later, the Health Survey Profile was expanded to include a ferritin test "automatically" at an allegedly nominal charge of an additional 65 cents.
Therefore a ferritin test helps to diagnose with certainty and the extent of iron deficiency in the body thus avoiding unnecessary iron supplementation.
Although the serum ferritin test has a reasonable theoretical basis for determining iron status, it has practical limitations that may complicate its clinical utility (Eschbach, 2005).