badger

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Related to ferret badger: honey badger, Melogale

badger

1. a coat color in dogs that consists of a mixture of white, gray, brown and black. May occur in patches. Seen in a variety of hound breeds and the Great Pyrenees dog.
2. a burrowing carnivore in the family Mustelidae.

American badger
Taxidea taxus; found in western North America. Called also taxel.
badger dog
literal translation of dachshund.
Eurasian badger
Meles meles. Important as a reservoir and maintenance host for Mycobacterium bovis in areas of the United Kingdom.
ferret badger
hog badger
Arctonyx collaris; found in Southeast Asia; called also hog-nosed badger, sand badger.
hog-nosed badger
see hog badger (above).
Japanese badger
melesanakuma.
sand badger
see hog badger (above).
References in periodicals archive ?
Last, our recent retrospective study that used the archived formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded brain tissues of ferret badgers, kindly provided by various institutes, demonstrated that the current earliest TWFB-associated RABV infection could be traced back to 2004 (H.
Genomic organization and nucleotide lengths of terminal and intergenic regions and viral genes of rabies virus from Taiwan and other lineages from Asia * Isolate 3'-UTR Gene, nucleotide length N N-P P TWFB 70 1,353 91 894 CNFB 70 1,353 91 894 China I ([dagger]) 70 1,353 90-91 894 China II ([dagger]) 70 1,353 91 894 Isolate Gene, nucleotide length P-M M M-G G TWFB 86 609 212 1,575 CNFB 86 609 211 1,575 China I ([dagger]) 87-88 609 211 1,575 China II ([dagger]) 87 609 211 1,575 Isolate Gene, nucleotide 5'-UTR Genome size length G-L L TWFB 519 6,384 130 11,923 CNFB 519 6,384 130-131 11,922-11,923 China I ([dagger]) 519 6,384 130 11,923 China II ([dagger]) 518-519 6,384 131 11,923-11,924 * UTR, untranslated region; TWFB, Taiwan ferret badgers; CNFB, Chinese ferret badgers.
Rabies fluorescent antibody virus neutralization assay results of ferret badger serum samples, China No.
Because the People's Republic of China has no governmental surveillance network, few data exist on wildlife rabies in China, and therefore the natural behavior and habitats of Chinese ferret badgers are not clear (7).
During 2007-2008, the population of the ferret badgers in the same regions seemed to recover, and rabies infection in badgers began to increase.