fermentation


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fermentation

 [fer″men-ta´shun]
the anaerobic enzymatic conversion of organic compounds, especially carbohydrates, to simpler compounds, especially to lactic acid or ethyl alcohol, producing energy in the form of ATP.

fer·men·ta·tion

(fĕr'men-tā'shŭn),
1. A chemical change induced in a complex organic compound by the action of an enzyme, whereby the substance is split into simpler compounds.
2. In bacteriology, the anaerobic dissimilation of substrates with the production of energy and reduced compounds; the mechanism of fermentation does not involve a respiratory chain or cytochrome, hence oxygen is not the final electron acceptor as it is in oxidation.
[L. fermento, pp. -atus, to ferment, from L. fermentum, yeast]

fermentation

/fer·men·ta·tion/ (fer″men-ta´shun) the anaerobic enzymatic conversion of organic compounds, especially carbohydrates, to simpler compounds, especially to ethyl alcohol, producing energy in the form of ATP.

fermentation

(fûr′mən-tā′shən, -mĕn-)
n.
Any of a group of chemical reactions induced by microorganisms or enzymes that split complex organic compounds into relatively simple substances, especially the anaerobic conversion of sugar to carbon dioxide and alcohol by yeast.

fermentation

[fur′məntā′shən]
Etymology: L, fermentare, to cause to rise
a chemical change that is brought about in a substance by the action of an enzyme or microorganism, especially the anaerobic conversion of foodstuffs to certain products. Kinds of fermentation are acetic fermentation, alcoholic fermentation, ammoniacal fermentation, amylic fermentation, butyric fermentation, caseous fermentation, dextran fermentation, diastatic fermentation, lactic acid fermentation, propionic fermentation, storing fermentation, and viscous fermentation.

fer·men·ta·tion

(fĕr'mĕn-tā'shŭn)
1. A chemical change induced in a complex organic compound by the action of an enzyme, whereby the substance is split into simpler compounds.
2. bacteriology The anaerobic dissimilation of substrates with the production of energy and reduced compounds; the mechanism of fermentation does not involve a respiratory chain or cytochrome, hence oxygen is not the final electron acceptor as it is in oxidation.
[L. fermento, pp. -atus, to ferment, from L. fermentum, yeast]

fermentation

  1. See ALCOHOLIC FERMENTATION.
  2. any industrial process involving the large-scale culturing of cells in either aerobic or anaerobic conditions, using fermenters.

fer·men·ta·tion

(fĕr'mĕn-tā'shŭn)
1. A chemical change induced in a complex organic compound by enzyme action, whereby a substance is split into simpler compounds.
2. In bacteriology, anaerobic dissimilation of substrates with production of energy and reduced compounds.
[L. fermento, pp. -atus, to ferment, from L. fermentum, yeast]

fermentation

the anaerobic enzymatic conversion of organic compounds, especially carbohydrates, to simpler compounds, especially to lactic acid or ethyl alcohol, producing energy in the form of ATP. An essential part of the digestion that goes on in the rumen and in the colon and cecum of horses. Used commercially in the preparation of alcoholic beverages and the generation of by-products used as animal feed. Also the basic process in the manufacture of antibiotics.

batch fermentation
one of the methods used in the industrial production of microorganisms, where the sterile growth medium is inoculated with the microorganisms and no additional growth medium is added.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is well known that epiphytic LAB play a major role in natural silage fermentation, and their numbers become a significant factor in predicting the adequacy of silage fermentation and determining whether or not to apply bacterial inoculants to silage materials (Kozaki et al.
The cellulose content of the residues was 28%, thus this resource may be a potential substrate for ethanol fermentation.
Conversely in coffee, the fermentation step is used to remove the fruit pulp and keep the seed.
For winemakers considering a first foray into spontaneous fermentation, here are some helpful hints to guide you on your journey.
During the fermentation period the temperatures (Table 1) and pH (Table 2) were observed simultaneously for every 24 hours.
Microbial fermentation of SBM is achieved using a fungi or a bacterial strain.
The single-use micro bioreactor vessel contains an impeller suitable for fermentation and is designed to provide enhanced capability compared to shaking culture systems.
Today, fermentation processes that use no antibiotics for bacterial control are less effective than those observed using Kamoran, the well known antibacterial agent already established in the market.
The recent advances in the fields of biotechnology and microbial fermentation technologies have resulted in a renewed attention in bio-butyric acid production from low cost renewable biomass (Zhang et al.
Entrapment in alginate gel has been studied widely, since it promotes the maintenance of cell activity and viability for much more time, and allows biomass reuse in multiple cycles of fermentation (BEHERA et al.