fermentable


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Related to fermentable: fermentable fiber

fer·ment·a·ble

(fĕr-ment'ă-bĕl),
Capable of undergoing fermentation.

fer·ment·a·ble

(fĕr-ment'ă-bĕl)
Capable of undergoing fermentation.

fermentable,

adj the ability to undergo a chemical reaction in the presence of an enzyme that results in the creation of either acid or alcohol; in the oral cavity, the ability to create acid in plaque.
References in periodicals archive ?
The higher fiber digestibility of T2 and T1 than T3 indicated that the fermentable energy from mulberry in the form of fiber with sufficient rumen degradable N or protein from either urea or mulberry in T2 and T1, respectively were able to produce higher fiber digestibility.
These materials can be removed from the fermentable sugar liquor by adding an oxidizing agent but this reduces the sugar production yield (the oxidizing agents also react with sugars).
More sugar means more fermentable product for brewing--and potentially more for ethanol production, as well.
5, after chewing gum, when plaque has been exposed to fermentable carbohydate.
The Novozymes/MBI collaboration is aimed at tailoring enzymes for AFEX-treated biomass, which will in turn enable the production of low-cost fermentable sugars.
These substances collectively are referred to as fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides, and polyols (FODMAPs).
Using the patented SurePure technology to produce a microbially stable liquid adjunct, which was added post the brewing process, yielded up to 30% more fermentable extract using the same amount of energy as conventional brewing.
It was found that mice given additional fiber supplements on top of a standard diet showed a reduction in these immune cells, but only if the supplement was easily fermentable in the gut.
Diets low in fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccha-rides, monosaccharides, and 1 polyols reduced functional gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with irritable bowel syndrome.
RESEARCH carried out in the United States has shown that early-to-mid lactation dairy rations should contain a minimum 6-7% fermentable sugars (on a dry matter basis) to support optimum rumen fermentation.
Here they may deliver healthy antioxidant activity and provide an all-natural, fermentable substrate for healthy bacterial microflora growth, thus setting the stage for a distinct advantage in fiber nutrition.
The starches in barley cannot be fermented, so they must be converted into a fermentable form, by malting.