ferment

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ferment

 [fer´ment]
1. to undergo fermentation.
2. any substance that causes fermentation.

fer·ment

(fĕr-ment'),
1. To cause or to undergo fermentation.
2. An agent that causes fermentation.
[L. fermentum, leaven]

ferment

/fer·ment/ (fer-ment´) to undergo fermentation; used for the decomposition of carbohydrates.

ferment

(fûr′mĕnt′)
n.
a. An agent, such as an enzyme, bacterium, or fungus, that brings about fermentation.
b. Fermentation.
v. (fər-mĕnt′) fer·mented, fer·menting, fer·ments
v.intr.
1. To undergo fermentation: cabbage that has fermented.
2. To develop in a turbulent or agitated way; seethe: an idea that was fermenting in his mind for months.
v.tr.
1. To cause to undergo fermentation: Yeasts ferment sugars.
2. To produce by or as if by fermentation: ferment the wine in oak barrels; hostility that was fermented by envy.
3. To make turbulent; excite or agitate: a fiery speech that fermented the crowd.

fer·ment′a·bil′i·ty n.
fer·ment′a·ble adj.

fer·ment

(fĕr-ment')
To cause or to undergo fermentation.
[L. fermentum, leaven]

ferment

1. to undergo fermentation.
2. any substance that causes fermentation.
References in periodicals archive ?
The idea was how to break it down, while maximizing the fermentability.
The fiber fermentability of the foodstuffs investigated in this study may, therefore, be governed by similar factors.
In the present study tannin showed depressing effect in fermentability and digestibility of browses.
Reducing the molecular weight of amylose by alpha-amylase action before beta-amylase activity markedly reduced the fermentability of the wort so produced, but this effect was less obvious with amylopectin or starch itself as a substrate.
Non-starch polysaccharide composition and in vitro fermentability of tropical forage legumes varying in phenolic content.
In addition, the effects of barley protein content on wort composition, fermentability, and beer stability were also evaluated.
The provision of forage fiber in the diet is an important factor for maintaining ruminal health, dietary NFC content, and fermentability.