ferment

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ferment

 [fer´ment]
1. to undergo fermentation.
2. any substance that causes fermentation.

fer·ment

(fĕr-ment'),
1. To cause or to undergo fermentation.
2. An agent that causes fermentation.
[L. fermentum, leaven]

ferment

/fer·ment/ (fer-ment´) to undergo fermentation; used for the decomposition of carbohydrates.

ferment

(fûr′mĕnt′)
n.
a. An agent, such as an enzyme, bacterium, or fungus, that brings about fermentation.
b. Fermentation.
v. (fər-mĕnt′) fer·mented, fer·menting, fer·ments
v.intr.
1. To undergo fermentation: cabbage that has fermented.
2. To develop in a turbulent or agitated way; seethe: an idea that was fermenting in his mind for months.
v.tr.
1. To cause to undergo fermentation: Yeasts ferment sugars.
2. To produce by or as if by fermentation: ferment the wine in oak barrels; hostility that was fermented by envy.
3. To make turbulent; excite or agitate: a fiery speech that fermented the crowd.

fer·ment′a·bil′i·ty n.
fer·ment′a·ble adj.

fer·ment

(fĕr-ment')
To cause or to undergo fermentation.
[L. fermentum, leaven]

ferment

1. to undergo fermentation.
2. any substance that causes fermentation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Microwaving barley grain did not further improve in vitro fermentability of barley grain, even when used in combination with enzymes.
The idea was how to break it down, while maximizing the fermentability.
Crude fiber fermentability has been identified as one of the limiting factors in utilization of high fiber content feeds such as bagasse.
Adsorption was a suitable process for improving the fermentability of lignocellulosic hydrolyzates, and the use of activated charcoal treatment is an efficient and economic method for the reduction of phenolic compounds and acetic acid found in hemicellulosic hydrolyzates (20).
Bauer E, Williams BA, Voigt C, Mosenthin R, Verstegen MWA (2003) Impact of mammalian enzyme pretreatment on the fermentability of carbohydrate-rich feedstuffs.
The launch range includes: C Bio-Gel 11300, a native maize starch with a relatively high viscosity; C Bio-Gel Instant 11400, a pregelatinished maize starch used to increase viscosity; and C Bio-Dex 11200, a dextrose monohydrate sweetener with a significant cooling effect, high osmolarity and high fermentability.
The complete fermentability of dextrose is advantageous in low-calorie beers.
Comparative digestibility of energy and nutrients and fermentability of dietary fiber in eight cereal grains fed to pigs.
2005) mixing high acacia pond and low dried acacia leaves presumably synchronized fermentability of all individual chemical constituents (especially nitrogen and carbohydrate) leading to associative effect in DM intake and digestibility hence the difference in the weight gain.