feral


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fer·al

(fer'ăl),
1. Denoting an animal that is wild and untamed.
2. An animal that was domesticated or tamed and returned to the wild.
3. Pertaining to wild beasts.
[L. fera, wild beast]

feral

(fîr′əl, fĕr′-)
adj.
a. Having returned to an untamed state from domestication: a pack of feral dogs.
b. Existing in a wild or untamed state.

feral

(of plants and animals) existing in a wild state, outside human cultivation or habitation.

feral

untamed; often used in the sense of having escaped from domesticity and run wild.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hunters need to be aware that feral hogs potentially carry these diseases.
We documented short-term impacts of feral hogs to pond perimeters, water quality, and aquatic arthropods at ponds on one of the primary recovery sites for the Houston toad, the Griffith League Ranch in Bastrop County.
Interactions between desert bighorn sheep and feral burros at spring areas in Death Valley.
While house cats wandered over a range of just under two hectares, the researchers found feral cats covered an average of 157 hectares.
The role of feral swine in IAV ecology has not been adequately addressed.
She said she's excited to be a partner in the CityCats program and hopes it will help cut the feral and stray populations in Springfield.
I was astonished to see how large they can grow and if we think of the amount of sheep that were lost over the last winter, it would make sense that these feral cats have been feeding well.
The Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute's Peter Marra estimates that outdoor cats in the United States, counting both pets and feral animals, kill up to 3.
One of the world's rarest seabirds has returned to its original home on Ascension Island nearly 180 years after it was wiped off the island by feral cats.
Applied population and community ecology; the case study of feral pigs in Australia.
Five, ten, or even fifteen years from now, when ecologists, wildlife biologists, conservationists and environmentalists worldwide look for an example to follow for future island restoration partnerships and efforts to remove feral animals, the San Nicolas Island Seabird Restoration Project will be at the top of the list.