fenugreek


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

fen·u·greek

(fen'yū-grēk),
An annual plant (Trigonella foenum-graecum) indigenous to western Asia and cultivated in Africa and parts of Europe; the mucilaginous seeds are used as food and in the preparation of culinary spices (curry).
[L. faenum graecum, fenugreek, fr. faenum, hay, + Graecus, Greek]

fenugreek

/fen·u·greek/ (fen´u-grēk) the leguminous plant Trigonella foenum-graecum, or its seeds, which are used for loss of appetite and skin inflammations; also used in traditional Chinese medicine and in Indian medicine.

fenugreek

an annual herb found in Europe and Asia.
uses It is used for loss of appetite, skin inflammation, water retention, cancer, constipation, diarrhea, high cholesterol, high blood glucose, and calcium oxalate stones. It may be effective at lowering blood glucose (slow intestinal absorption) and as a poultice for local inflammation, but there are insufficient reliable data on its efficacy for other uses.
contraindications It should not be used during pregnancy because it can cause premature labor. It is also contraindicated during lactation, in children, and in those with known hypersensitivity to this herb.

fenugreek

Herbal medicine
An annual herb, the seeds of which contain alkaloids (e.g., choline and gentianine), flavonoids, minerals, mucilage, protein, steroidal saponins (e.g., diosgenin) and vitamins A, B and C. Fenugreek is used internally (herbal tea) for bronchitis, depression, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, postmenopausal syndrome, rheumatic disease, sore throat and tuberculosis, and topically for gout, lymphadenitis, neuralgia, sciatica, skin infections and wounds; it is believed by some to be an aphrodisiac.

fen·u·greek

(fen'yū-grēk)
(Trigonella foenum-graecum) Purported therapeutic use in GI disorders; also used topically; may cause bleeding disorders and hypoglycemia.
Synonym(s): Greek hay.
[L. faenum graecum, fenugreek, fr. faenum, hay, + Graecus, Greek]

fenugreek (fenˑ·y·grēkˈ),

n Latin name:
Trigonella foenum-graecum; part used: seeds; uses: dyspepsia, constipation, gastritis. Topically, used to treat cellulitis, leg ulcers, wound healing; precautions: hypersensitivity reactions, pregnancy, children, lactation; causes bruising, bleeding, petechiae; interferes with absorption of other medications, anticoagulants, and antidiabetics. Also called
Bird's foot, Greek hayseed, and
trigonella.
Enlarge picture
Fenugreek.

fenugreek

References in periodicals archive ?
Anti-inflammatory, antipyretic and anti-anxiety effects of leaf extracts of fenugreek were proved in animal models (19, 34, 45-48).
For example fenugreek a traditional spice and forage species have been described as a novel nutraceutical crop and the two chapters (Chapters 5 & 20) dealing with this crop are an absolute delight to read.
They also determined the amylose content of the raw materials and extrudates, as well as the anti-diabetic component of fenugreek and the extrudates.
In India, where fenugreek is known as hepoundet, in addition to the seeds being used as a spice, they are employed to overcome evil.
Basterma, a cured meat that utilizes fenugreek and is frequently coupled with eggs in Egypt at breakfast time, stands at the forefront and takes the brunt of it all.
Vivek, who is an honorary graduate, said turmeric and fenugreek are two spices that stand out for him.
The effect of PGPB on several plants has already been studied, but little work has been carried out to elucidate the effect of biofertilizer on fenugreek plants.
Now fry the whole red chillies, fenugreek seeds, cumin and mustard seeds.
This delicious curry combines tender chicken pieces and fenugreek leaves with spices like black cardamom and bay leaf.
Raan (lamb leg), 400gm; curd, 150gm; red chilli powder, 10gm; garam masala, 10gm cumin powder, 5gm; coriander powder, 5gm; dried fenugreek leaves (kasuri methi), 5gm; salt, 10gm; mustard oil, 150ml; nutmeg, 5gm; ginger-garlic paste, 20gm