fenugreek


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fen·u·greek

(fen'yū-grēk),
An annual plant (Trigonella foenum-graecum) indigenous to western Asia and cultivated in Africa and parts of Europe; the mucilaginous seeds are used as food and in the preparation of culinary spices (curry).
[L. faenum graecum, fenugreek, fr. faenum, hay, + Graecus, Greek]

fenugreek

/fen·u·greek/ (fen´u-grēk) the leguminous plant Trigonella foenum-graecum, or its seeds, which are used for loss of appetite and skin inflammations; also used in traditional Chinese medicine and in Indian medicine.

fenugreek

an annual herb found in Europe and Asia.
uses It is used for loss of appetite, skin inflammation, water retention, cancer, constipation, diarrhea, high cholesterol, high blood glucose, and calcium oxalate stones. It may be effective at lowering blood glucose (slow intestinal absorption) and as a poultice for local inflammation, but there are insufficient reliable data on its efficacy for other uses.
contraindications It should not be used during pregnancy because it can cause premature labor. It is also contraindicated during lactation, in children, and in those with known hypersensitivity to this herb.

fenugreek

Herbal medicine
An annual herb, the seeds of which contain alkaloids (e.g., choline and gentianine), flavonoids, minerals, mucilage, protein, steroidal saponins (e.g., diosgenin) and vitamins A, B and C. Fenugreek is used internally (herbal tea) for bronchitis, depression, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, postmenopausal syndrome, rheumatic disease, sore throat and tuberculosis, and topically for gout, lymphadenitis, neuralgia, sciatica, skin infections and wounds; it is believed by some to be an aphrodisiac.

fen·u·greek

(fen'yū-grēk)
(Trigonella foenum-graecum) Purported therapeutic use in GI disorders; also used topically; may cause bleeding disorders and hypoglycemia.
Synonym(s): Greek hay.
[L. faenum graecum, fenugreek, fr. faenum, hay, + Graecus, Greek]

fenugreek (fenˑ·y·grēkˈ),

n Latin name:
Trigonella foenum-graecum; part used: seeds; uses: dyspepsia, constipation, gastritis. Topically, used to treat cellulitis, leg ulcers, wound healing; precautions: hypersensitivity reactions, pregnancy, children, lactation; causes bruising, bleeding, petechiae; interferes with absorption of other medications, anticoagulants, and antidiabetics. Also called
Bird's foot, Greek hayseed, and
trigonella.
Enlarge picture
Fenugreek.

fenugreek

References in periodicals archive ?
Recent studies suggested that fenugreek has anti-carcinogenic potential and potential allergens (Pandian et al.
Hence, fenugreek saponin can suppress cholesterol synthesis, but it might accelerate the synthesis of triglyceride under high-dose treatment.
Ration F3: without antibiotics/ antioxidants, supplemented by fenugreek crude extracts 1mL per kg diet.
In total, 88 women were randomised to treatment with fenugreek extract or placebo, with similar personal and societal characteristics at baseline and no significant differences on serum hormone levels and metabolic profiles at baseline.
The objective of scientists at Alabama A&M University was to determine the ways by which processing influences the phytochemical and antioxidant potential of fenugreek leaves and seeds.
Add cashew nuts, cumin seeds, dried fenugreek leaves, chillies, ginger, garlic, and fry till slightly brown.
Due to the presence of a substantial amount of fiber, phospholipids, glycolipids, oleic acid, linolenic acid, linoleic acid, choline, vitamins A, B1, B2, C, nicotinic acid, niacin and many other functional elements, Fenugreek seed is one of the hottest ingredients in health and wellness.
TV chef and Warwick |University honorary graduate Vivek Singh will be joining its 50th birthday celebrations to explore the benefits of Indian spices, and particularly fenugreek and (inset) turmeric
Fenugreek is found as a component of commercially available curry powder blends, as well as a flavoring agent in foods and beverages.
Background: Fenugreek is an aromatic plant widely grown worldwide.
Only one good study has looked at fenugreek and Ale in people with type 2 diabetes.