fence


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fence

an outdoor partition made of timber, wire or other material effective in keeping animals apart.

introductory fence
one that will keep animals apart but which is pervious enough, e.g. made of wire netting, that there is plenty of opportunity for visual, olfactory and licking contact of new introductions before actually co-mingling them.
References in classic literature ?
If you was to tackle this fence and anything was to happen to it --"
Now the lions were close to us; they came to the body of the second cub, that lay outside the fence of thorns.
When it came, I saw that he was a sturdy man, cheaply but not shabbily dressed; his head was bent under his body, and he lay crumpled up close to the fence, as though he had been flung violently against it.
They could be seen plainly-- tall, gaunt men with excited faces running with long strides toward a wandering fence.
No," it said; "I've really got to cut down this fence somehow; it's spoiling all the plants, and no one else here can do it.
Then she climbed down from the fence and walked up to it, while Toto ran around the pole and barked.
Motives are all very well, but the fence comes here.
As he stood wondering whether he should go to the fence and look over, or simply accept the phenomenon as one of those things which no fellow can understand, there popped up before him the head and shoulders of a girl.
Because it was summer, when it is so beautiful out in the fields, the little town presented a particularly dismal appearance with its broken roofs and fences, its foul streets, tattered inhabitants, and the sick and drunken soldiers wandering about.
Occasionally a rebel Fig climbs over the fence into the world, and such a one was Miss Mabel Grey, of whom I shall tell you when we come to Miss Mabel Grey's gate.
They had traveled some distance when suddenly they faced a high fence which barred any further progress straight ahead.
When the King, with his gentlemen, entered the armory he was still smarting from the humiliation of De Montfort's reproaches, and as he laid aside his surcoat and plumed hat to take the foils with De Fulm his eyes alighted on the master of fence, Sir Jules de Vac, who was advancing with the King's foil and helmet.