fence


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fence

an outdoor partition made of timber, wire or other material effective in keeping animals apart.

introductory fence
one that will keep animals apart but which is pervious enough, e.g. made of wire netting, that there is plenty of opportunity for visual, olfactory and licking contact of new introductions before actually co-mingling them.
References in classic literature ?
That means," he said, "that there's a Woozy inside that fence, and the Woozy must be a dangerous animal or they wouldn't tell people to beware of it.
If you was to tackle this fence and anything was to happen to it --"
he hissed, and struck the master of fence a stinging blow across the face, and spat upon him.
He thought it annoying that in the darkness by the fence she had pretended there was nothing between them.
Now the lions were close to us; they came to the body of the second cub, that lay outside the fence of thorns.
The scabs and their protectors, surrounded, backed against Saxon's fence, fought like cornered rats, but could not withstand the rush of a hundred men.
Russian thistles were blowing across the uplands and piling against the wire fences like barricades.
The fences are fastened to heavy oaken posts only three feet apart, and these posts are sunk five feet in the ground.
Three notice-boards, belonging to Dorking agents, lolled on her fence and announced the not surprising fact.
But the enemy were quick to gain the protec- tion of the wandering line of fence.
Dorothy helped him over the fence, and they started along the path of yellow brick for the Emerald City.
Dunstan, however, took one fence too many, and got his horse pierced with a hedge-stake.