femoral anteversion


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Related to femoral anteversion: femoral retroversion

femoral anteversion

inward twisting of the femur so that the knees and feet turn inward, usually seen in children or in persons with osteoarthritis of the hip.

fem·o·ral an·te·ver·sion

(fem'ŏr-ăl an'tĕ-vĕr-zhŭn)
A condition of abnormal medial rotation of the thigh at the hip joint.

femoral anteversion

Excessive anterior angulation of the neck of the femur, leading to excessive internal rotation of the femur. The normal value for femoral neck anteversion is approx. 15°.
See also: anteversion

femoral anteversion

transverse-plane deformity of proximal femur; femoral head and neck are positioned anterior relative to the body of the femur, with resultant internal leg rotation and in-toeing gait
References in periodicals archive ?
A normal femoral anteversion (FA) angle is an important factor in maintaining hip stability and normal gait in humans.
Femoral Anteversion in healthy children: application of a new method using ultrasound.
Material and Methods: We studied 211 dry adult femora, free of disease, by Kingsley Olmsted method to determine femoral anteversion angle.
There are a number of clinical studies about femoral anteversion focused either on technical complexity of measuring the angle in patients (Magilligan 1956; Miller et al.
Measurement of femoral anteversion by magnetic resonance imaging-evaluation of a new technique in children and adolescents.
Internal femoral anteversion (IFA), or twisted thighbone, describes the position of the femur, which is medially rotated on its long axis at birth.
1994) Silvers & Mandelbaum Increased Q angle, femoral anteversion, (2007) subtalar hyperpronation, and excessive tibial torsion.
Femoral anteversion is not associated with any functional deficit or long-term risk of osteoarthritis.
Several anatomical factors contribute to PFS, including femoral anteversion, kneecaps pointing toward each other ("squinting patella"), genu varum (bowleg), and tibia varum.
Several anatomic factors contribute to PFS, including femoral anteversion, kneecaps pointing toward each other ("squinting patella"), genu varum (bowleg), and tibia varum.
This position is useful for demonstrating the relationship of the femoral head to the acetabulum and to assess the degree of femoral anteversion.