femoral anteversion


Also found in: Dictionary.
Related to femoral anteversion: femoral retroversion

femoral anteversion

inward twisting of the femur so that the knees and feet turn inward, usually seen in children or in persons with osteoarthritis of the hip.

fem·o·ral an·te·ver·sion

(fem'ŏr-ăl an'tĕ-vĕr-zhŭn)
A condition of abnormal medial rotation of the thigh at the hip joint.

femoral anteversion

Excessive anterior angulation of the neck of the femur, leading to excessive internal rotation of the femur. The normal value for femoral neck anteversion is approx. 15°.
See also: anteversion

femoral anteversion

transverse-plane deformity of proximal femur; femoral head and neck are positioned anterior relative to the body of the femur, with resultant internal leg rotation and in-toeing gait
References in periodicals archive ?
Davids JR, Benfanti P, Blackhurst DW, Allen BL Assessment of femoral anteversion in children with cerebral palsy: accuracy of the trochanteric prominence angle test.
Measurement of femoral anteversion by magnetic resonance imaging-evaluation of a new technique in children and adolescents.
Femoral anteversion related to side differences in hip rotation.
Femoral anteversion is identified clinically by examining the child in prone position with 90[degrees] flexion at the knee.
The definitions of gait deviations related with femoral anteversion are highly questionable (5).
It would be very useful information for clinicians and surgeons, if any relationship could be defined between the femoral anteversion and the gait deviations, taking into consideration only the bony deformity and its compensatory responses, and excluding the muscle spasticity, selective motor control and sensory-motor problems.
The aim of the study is to identify the gait deviations clearly due to the increased femoral anteversion and to distinguish these deviations from the other causes, which are commonly seen in children with spastic diplegic CP The hypothesis was that the increasing flexion motion and extensor moment at the hip and knee during stance phase, which are commonly seen in children with crouch gait, have a strong relationship with IFA.
Of these children, 9 were with spastic diplegic with increased femoral anteversion (CPIFA) (mean age 7.
Femoral anteversion was measured geometrically (Figure 1) as described previously (3).
According to literature femoral anteversion does not change or negligibly changes the rotational lever arm of the hamstrings and adductors (12,13).
There is no study that includes neurologically intact children with increased femoral anteversion in the literature.
These again include an increased Q angle (increased femoral anteversion, genu valgum, tibia vara isolated to the proximal tibia, or external tibial torsion), MPFL insufficiency, patella alta, or patellofemoral dysplasia.