feminize

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feminize

(fĕm′ə-nīz′)
tr.v. femi·nized, femi·nizing, femi·nizes
1. To cause to have qualities that are perceived as feminine: "The compassion ... is so insistently present [in this crime novel] that it feminizes the narrative" (Lee Horsley).
2. To cause (a male) to assume physical characteristics of a female, as through the influence of hormones.

fem′i·ni·za′tion (-nĭ-zā′shən) n.
References in periodicals archive ?
Gonadal intersex includes disruption of the gonadal duct, where the male duct is feminized to form a female-like ovarian cavity, and/or the presence of both male and female germ cells within the same gonad (Nolan et al.
This little world of dance, however feminized, blurred gender definition.
likewise majority feminized, have been striving to produce a "moderately" feminist lectionary that would please the Vatican and most of the bishops.
Although I initially thought the top 10 names for girls that year (Emily, Madison, Hannah, Emma, Alexis, Ashley, Abigail, Sarah, Samantha, and Olivia) were not, I discovered that most of them are, as it turns out, either saints, biblical women, or feminized forms of male saints or holy men--albeit lesser known ones.
In the 1930s the Soviet retail workforce was increasingly feminized.
The fourteen portraits in this room were all of people extravagantly dressed and posed, here in lame catsuit, there in houndstooth and loden cape, here blending into an English-style garden, there pumped up like a feminized Schwarzenegger.
5] did not significantly alter the percentage of females and the histologic structure of ovaries, but they induced feminized testes in gross morphology and in histologic structure.
In a fine article, "Caterina of Siena and the Legacy of Humanism," Jane Tylus presents Saint Catherine as a bridge between an older Humanism, which was a male bastion and stressed civic involvement, and a newer one, which embraced a more feminized form of piety involving the public performance of charitable acts, a traditionally female activity.
These women are not "exiles" but "immigrants," a term that "carries with it a different, arguably feminized, status to the metropole; one associated with physical, not intellectual, labor.
Greenfield's suggestion is not new--that when any cultural product becomes overcommercialized and full of swill, it has, in fact, been feminized.
She explains how in illustrated magazines such as Vogue and Femina and press coverage, the new masculine style was feminized by bourgeois Frenchwomen.
The sublime states the works represent, the many feminized spaces they inaugurate with telescoping interiorities and fragmentation, and the potential identities they support place them at the forefront of the artist's production.