feminist therapy


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feminist therapy

an alternative therapy that is both a philosophic approach to the conduct of therapy and a specific type of therapy. The focus of both types is a consciousness raising that focuses on the presence of sexism and sex role stereotyping in society.

feminist therapy

Psychiatry Psychotherapy that incorporates feminist/women's rights–I am woman, HEAR ME ROAR–philosophy into therapeutic goals; FT attempts to empower ♀ and battle societal barriers to self-actualization
References in periodicals archive ?
Focusing on the practical application of feminist theory to clinical experience, Introduction to Feminist Therapy provides guidelines to help therapists master social action and empowerment techniques, feminist diagnostic and assessment strategies and gender role and power analyses to foster individual and social change.
Social discourses of motherhood and sexuality are relevant at a variety of levels of clinical focus, and attention to power dynamics is a central component of feminist therapy (Rader & Gilbert, 2005).
The evolution of feminist therapy involves the reconstruction of therapeutic goals, values, frameworks, and theory, as well as an acknowledgement that there is no single reality, no one "right" feminist theory or epistemological position about women.
Rather than focusing on theoretical and clinical issues, this practical manual of feminist therapy for students and practitioners discusses specific techniques used in feminist therapy and illustrates them with case studies and vignettes, exercises, and discussion questions.
Proclaiming that feminist therapy is not only for women, clinical/ forensic psychologist Brown (in private practice, Seattle) describes a therapeutic approach that seeks to empower clients while still influencing mainstream practice.
Seval Kizildag and Nilufer Voltan-Acar's, analyse Turkish author Halide Edip Adivar's novel entitled "Vurun Kahpeye" in terms of basic concepts and principles of feminist therapy in the second article.
The program is informed by principles of feminist therapy and feminist psychology even as it exists within a university hospital.
Plus, reservations about a number of practices within feminist therapy are challenged, in particular, the use of self-disclosure and the need for all therapists to become social activists (Cheryl Dileo).
Keywords: male anorexia nervosa, masculinity, feminist therapy, social stigma, DSM-IV
Feminist therapists and others who have adapted the feminist therapy model provide a variety of techniques to help both women and men differentiate between what they have been taught is socially acceptable or desirable and what is actually healthy for them (Enns, 1993; Sharf, 2000; Worell & Remer, 1992).
She noted that both themes ultimately call for feminist therapy and feminist research.
2000; Peterson & Mitchell), nutritional counseling (Kahm, 1999), guided imagery (Hutchinson, 1994), interpersonal therapy (Fairburn, 1997; McIntosh, Bulik, McKenzie, Luty, & Jordan, 2000; Peterson & Mitchell; Wilfley, Dounchis, & Robinson-Welch, 2000), family therapy (LeGrange, 1999), feminist therapy (Tantillo, 2000), group therapy (Davis, Olmsted, Rockert, Marques, & Dolhanty, 1997; Tantillo) and narrative therapy (Garrett, 1997; Pale::, 2000; Reindl, 2001).